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FORD BRONCO -> ELECTRICAL; EEC/PCM, Self-Test, wiring diagrams... -> Electronic Engine Control (EEC); SELF TEST & Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC), OBD II, etc. -> EEC-V (OBD II) Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC), etc.
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This is a Ford Bronco, Truck & Van Technical & Parts LINKS site developed by the MIESK5 Family & is not affiliated with the Ford Motor Co. in any manner.
Although we initially developed this site for 78-96 Big Broncos, information in many Links also applies to F, E Series & Cars. UPDATE; all Links via web.archive may be down; Copy orig. URL & go to http://replay.waybackmachine.org/ to search for the new archived copy
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Carburetor & C6 Conversion to EFI/OBD II & EO4D
DTC P1742 TSB 96-5-16 for 96 Bronco, E & F Series; Application Chart; "...The Check Engine lamp may illuminate and a Code P1742 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present. This may be caused by an improper signaling within the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). ACTION: Reprogram or replace the PCM. Refer to the following Service Procedure for details..."
Electronic Modules, Protection From Damage by Static Electricity TSB 88-13-3 for All Light Truck Lines, etc.
Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) ("Check Engine Light") Illumination; The "Check Engine" lamp may illuminate and a Code P0420 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present.TSB 96-15-13 for 96 Bronco, F Series & Econoline w/5.0L
Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) ("Check Engine Light") Illumination; The "Check Engine" lamp may illuminate and a Code P1742 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present.TSB 96-6-9 for 96 Bronco, F Series & Econoline w/E4OD
Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) Introduction TSB 88-05-07 for 88 Bronco, F series, & all others
Powertrain Control Module Reprogramming TSB 97-09-08 in 96
Powertrain Control Module Reprogramming TSB 99-4-3 in 96
Scan Tool Won’t Initiate Self-Tests (solid tone only); E4OD transmission control switch wiring may be misrouted causing a short in the steering column and a blown # 17 fuse for 92-96 in TSB 92-22-5 for 92 Bronco & all Light Trucks
Select A Link:
Check Engine Light (CEL) Overview in 92-96; "...The check engine warning indicator comes on when the electronic engine control system is not working properly. The check engine warning indicator comes on briefly when the ignition switch lock cylinder is turned to ON, and should turn off when the engine starts. If the check engine warning indicator does not come on when the ignition switch lock cylinder is turned to ON or if it comes on while the vehicle is moving, the system is malfunctioning...) read more
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Ford Control Module Overview, from Ford Fuel Injection and Electronic Engine Control: How to Understand, Service and Modify, 1988-1993
Source: by Charles O. Probst via yunost.ru
1996 MY OBD-II System Operation Summary
Source: by Ford motorcraftservice.com
Actron CP9135 AutoScanner Diagnostic Code Scanner Review with On Screen Definitions
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
Adaptive Strategy Relearn Procedure: After repairs have been made and the KAM cleared drive the vehicle for at least ten miles to allow the PCM to relearn the values for optimum performance. Note: During the ten mile relearn drive, the vehicle may exhibit some driveability symptoms. These should be eliminated when the KAM has relearned the operating values.
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at Ford Bronco Zone Forums
Air Bag DTC 32, Driver Side Air Bag Circuit High Resistance or Open; "...indicates that the driver's side airbag circuit has high resistance or is open. In simpler terms, there may be a broken wire. This problem may have some relationship to the horn and cruise control failure that your experiencing as well. Has any work been performed on the steering column or under the dash of your vehicle? In either case, you should have the problem checked out. If the wrong wires get crossed with the airbag wires you could be in for a sudden surprise..."
Source: by Jim G at alldata.com
Break-Out Box Overview; "...The breakout box put itself between the engine and the computer, and allowed the user to rapciously access the information being exchanged. They are simply a pinout board, mounted in a box, with associated cabling, like this... You can see the way the cabling hooks into the computer and then bridges into the automobile system. A closer look at the pinout board, little holes numbered to correspond to the numbered wires in the connector:The output is readable with a high impedance (this is IMPORTANT- Digital Volts Ohmeter (DVOM) No cheap knockoffs here, they may fry the computer by introducing their own voltage.) Not as fancy as a scanner which decodes the meaning for you, but valuable nonetheless because you can always look up every meaning of the output signal somewhere. Like on the factory manual CD or in the manual itself! FORD decided to make maximum use of the breakout box, and designed add ons to allow you to look at other systems. Here for example, is a harness (still looking new in the wrapper) that hooks into all the Distributorless Ignition System (DIS). It connects to the sensor connectors... allowing you full access to the signals, even while the engine is running: TFI (thick film Ignition) Yes there is a cable for this. Mine cost me $15. Here is the diagram ...There was an adapter for the breakout box that read the brake codes, AND... AND... did the procedure for properly bleeding them. It was called the anitlock Brake Adapter (ALA) and looks like this when installed in the unbilical for the breakout box: Betwen $125 and $200 on E-bay. Worth every penny if you want to look inside that engine..."
Source: by Glacier991 (Chris) at explorerforum.com
Break-Out Box Overview; "...The breakout box put itself between the engine and the computer, and allowed the user to rapciously access the information being exchanged. They are simply a pinout board, mounted in a box, with associated cabling, like this... You can see the way the cabling hooks into the computer and then bridges into the automobile system. A closer look at the pinout board, little holes numbered to correspond to the numbered wires in the connector:The output is readable with a high impedance (this is IMPORTANT- Digital Volts Ohmeter (DVOM) No cheap knockoffs here, they may fry the computer by introducing their own voltage.) Not as fancy as a scanner which decodes the meaning for you, but valuable nonetheless because you can always look up every meaning of the output signal somewhere. Like on the factory manual CD or in the manual itself! FORD decided to make maximum use of the breakout box, and designed add ons to allow you to look at other systems. Here for example, is a harness (still looking new in the wrapper) that hooks into all the Distributorless Ignition System (DIS). It connects to the sensor connectors... allowing you full access to the signals, even while the engine is running: TFI (thick film Ignition) Yes there is a cable for this. Mine cost me $15. Here is the diagram ...There was an adapter for the breakout box that read the brake codes, AND... AND... did the procedure for properly bleeding them. It was called the anitlock Brake Adapter (ALA) and looks like this when installed in the unbilical for the breakout box: Betwen $125 and $200 on E-bay. Worth every penny if you want to look inside that engine..."
Source: by Glacier991 (Chris) at explorerforum.com
Calibration Code in Vehicle Emission Control Information (VECI) Decal; Contains Vacuum Diagram & Calibration Parts List for 88 & UP. On-Line for Free at Ford. Click "Quick Guides" in left panel; Scroll to & CLICK VECI Labels "Provides Vehicle Emission Control Information (VECI) and a related calibration parts list." Enter applicable info (need to know your Calibration number from your B-pillar sticker). Vacuum Diagram is the same as the one on the core support or hood or air filter cover. Suggest Right Clicking this Hot Link & Open in New Window.
Source: by Ford motorcraftservice.com
Calibration Code Location & pic; on PCM @ Drivers side kick panel. "...The 1996-2007 Ford codes are directly above the UPC stamp on the white label which is glued to the ECU connector, and on a black plastic cover on the computer J3 port. Ford Codes are always 3 letters and one number; also see your Calibration number from your B-pillar sticker..."
Source: by Westers Garage
Calibration Code Overview
Source: by CARDONE® cardone.com
Calibration Code Overview & pic; "...Using the Ford Calibration Code System Ford Motor Company assigned a "Calibration Code" to All makes and models of Ford, Lincoln and Mercury vehicles for mode years 1996 through 2002. This Ca Code grouped All emssion control components into a parts list. The CaL Code number can be located on a printed label either on the door frame or on the electronic engine control (EEC) connector on or near the firewall. (See the photo below). Please be careful to locate the correct CaL Code since many resemble each other. Pay attention to the location details for your specific sensor. For model years before and after 1996- 2002, please refer to the specific Applicaton Guide for your vehicle..."
Source: by walkerproducts.com
Check Engine Light (CEL) Overview in a 96; "...The light comes on briefly when you turn the ignition key to ON, but it should turn off when the engine starts. If the light does not come on when you turn the ignition to ON or if it comes on and stays on when you are driving, have your vehicle serviced as soon as possible. This indicates a possible problem with one of the vehicle’s emission control systems. You do not need to have your vehicle towed in. If the light turns on and off at one (1) second intervals while you are driving the vehicle, it means that the engine is misfiring. If this condition persists, damage could occur to the engine or catalytic convertor. Have your vehicle serviced at the first opportunity. You do not need to have your vehicle towed in. If the light turns on and off on rare occasions while you are driving, it means that a malfunction occurred and the condition corrected itself. An example of a condition which corrects itself occurs when an engine running out of fuel begins to misfire. In this case, the Check EngineWarning Light may turn on and will then set a Diagnostic Trouble Code DTC) indicating that the engine was misfiring while the last of the fuel was being consumed. After refueling, the Check Engine Warning Light will turn off after the vehicle has completed three consecutive warmup cycles without a misfire condition occurring.A warm up cycle consists of engine start from a cold condition (engine at ambient temperature) and running until the engine reaches normal operating temperature. On the fourth engine start up, the Check EngineWarning Light will turn off as soon as the engine begins to crank. It is not necessary to have the engine serviced. Under certain conditions, the Check EngineWarning Light may come on if the fuel cap is not properly installed. If the Check EngineWarning Light comes on and you suspect that the fuel cap is not properly installed, pull off the road as soon as it is safely possible and turn off the engine. Remove and replace the fuel cap, making sure it is properly seated. After completing the three consecutive warm upcycles and on the fourth engine start up, the Check Engine Warning Light should turn off. If the light does not go off after the fourth engine restart, have your vehicle serviced by your dealer or a qualified technician..."
Source: by Ford via Hiller Ford
Check Engine Light (CEL; Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL)) Overview in a 96; "...The check engine warning indicator comes on when the electronic engine control system is not working properly. The CHECK ENGINE warning indicator comes on briefly when the key is turned to RUN, and should turn off when the engine (6007) starts. If the CHECK ENGINE warning indicator does not come on when the key is turned to RUN or if it comes on while the vehicle is moving, the system is malfunctioning. NOTE: If the vehicle is equipped with dual fuel tanks (9002), the CHECK ENGINE light may come on if fuel is restricted to the engine or if the fuel flow is momentarily disrupted because of an empty fuel tank before switching to the auxiliary fuel tank. This condition is normal and the CHECK ENGINE light should go off sometime after fuel flow is restored..." from 1996 F-150, F-250, F-350, Bronco, F-Super Duty Motorhome Chassis Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Code Reader Overview & pic; "is a cheap $40 reader from Harbor Freight"
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
Code Reader Will NOT Power up; 96 Bronco & all Ford; "Check fuse 16 (15 amps) for the cigarette lighter. It is shared with the OBDII Diagnostic Link Connector power and could be blown; miesk5 note; lighter wiring shorted out @ ashtray support blowing Fuse for it & Diagnostic Link Connector. Besides the visual check, if it looks good, then check for 12V .. if not 12v, then check Maxi-Fuse 20 (50 amps) - (it powers Fuses 4, 8 and [B]16 [/B] in (IP Fuse Panel). Also See Circuit Breaker 12) in Power Distribution Box Diagram in a 96; Miesk5 Note; Box is Located under the hood on the drivers side fenderwell, on driver's side of the air cleaner housing; there is a change from Letters to Numbers in 96; " miesk5 note; our 96's lighter wiring shorted out @ ashtray support..."
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
Code Reader Will NOT Power up; 96 Bronco & all Ford; "Check fuse 16 (Bronco) for the cigarette lighter. It is shared with the OBDII connector power and is commonly blown" miesk5 note; our 96's lighter wiring shorted out @ ashtray support
Source: by kozloski at obdii.com
Code Reader/ Star Test Connector (Bronco Only) Wiring Harness & Component Location Diagram, Ford Part Numbers, Depictions, etc. from Ford Workshop Manual in 96 Bronco, F-150, F-250, F-350, F-Super Duty Chassis Cab & Motorhome ChassisWiring Harness & Component Location Diagram, Ford Part Numbers, Depictions, etc. from Ford Workshop Manual in 96 Bronco, F-150, F-250, F-350, F-Super Duty Chassis Cab & Motorhome Chassis; use your Browser's SEARCH (or FIND) function to locate what you seek in each Diagram, such as star, etc.
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Connector Pin-Out Diagram (without Circuit Functions) & Overview; "...EEC-V uses a new 104-Pin connector to accommodate more sensors and actuators to help it grow beyond just engine and transmission control. The new EEC also had to apply to newer 1996 government regulations, these were labeled as �On-Board-Diagnostics II,� and they required a new test plug called the Diagnostic Link Connector. All brands sold in the USA had to use the same test connector, and it has to be within reach of the driver�s seat..."
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Connector Re-Pin/Repair Video
Source: by pfun41 at youtube.com
Cylinder Balance Test; NOTE: This test is only available on 95 Bronco w/1995 CA/MAF/SFI PCM (BIO0) & 96 Bronco; & Sequential Fuel Injection (SFI) Engines
Source: by SigEpBlue (Steve) & Bronco4Life at FSB
Cylinder Balance Test; NOTE: This test is only available on 95 Bronco w/1995 CA/MAF/SFI PCM (BIO0) & 96 Bronco; & Sequential Fuel Injection (SFI) Engines. "...The Cylinder Balance test on the 5.0L SEFI and 5.0L SEFI MA vehicles is designed to aid in the detection of a noncontributing cylinder. The Cylinder Balance test, first reads engine rpm, with all injectors activated. Next, each injector is turned "off and on," one at a time. The rpm drop that results, if any, is then read. These two rpm's are compared to verify that the rpm drop was greater than a calibrated level. The Cylinder Balance Test service codes correspond with cylinder number followed by a "O" on a scanner. Example 20 = cyl #2. 1. Perform Engine Running Self-Test. 2. After the last repeated service code is received, wait 5-10 seconds. 3. Lightly depress and release throttle (not wide-open throttle) within two mintutes of the last repeated service code. 4. Cylinder Balance Test will be per formed at the first test level.Test time is approximately three minutes..." read more
Source: by Tomco Inc. tomco-inc.com
Dash Harness pic in a 96 F 150; "...some connectors have been removed..."
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Detonation and/or Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) Illumination with DTCs 332, P1407, and/or P1408 May Occur Under Normal Driving Conditions TSB 96-23-4 for Various Cars; Just because the vehicle is not listed in the TSB doesn’t mean you may not have a clogging problem; Figures are missing see Tomco Link Titled, DTC 332, P1407 and P1408 or detonation
Source: by Ford via way2old at fordforum.com
Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) (Test Connector) to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) Connector Location, Behind Instrument Panel Diagram in a 96, Page 1
Source: by Ford via Chilton
Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) Location pic in a 96; Boss Has a cord plugged into it (end rolled up on tranny hum carpet) in this pic; is under of ashtray, to right
Source: by bossind (boss, Steve) at SuperMotors.net
Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) Location pic in a 96; Boss Has a cord plugged into it (end rolled up on tranny hum carpet) in this pic; is under of ashtray, to right
Source: by bossind (boss, Steve) at FSB
Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) Location, Bronco , Ford & other makes; Bronco - "Center console, vertical surface right of vehicle centerline or on passenger side of center console" or in non-console models, same area below dash
Source: by nology.com
Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) Pin-Out Diagram in a 96
Source: by obdii.com
Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) Pin-Out Diagram in a 96
Source: by miesk5 at broncolinks.com/gallery
Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC), No Power; "...cig lighter's 12v vehicle power (VPWR) Lt Blue/White wire chaffed & shorted on ashtray frame. It caused Fuse 16 to blow itself..out (& in 96, this also caused the OBD II Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) not to "power up" @ pin 16)..."
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
Drive Cycle (scroll down)
Source: by Larry C at aa1car.com
Drive Cycle, Ford
Source: by obdii.com
Drive Cycle; "...The engine must be warmed up and at operating temperature before proceeding with the drive modes of the following OBD II Drive Cycle. 1. Start the engine. Drive or idle (in neutral) the vehicle for 4 minutes. 2. Idle the vehicle in drive (neutral for manual transmission) for 40 seconds. 3. Accelerate the vehicle to 45 mph (72 km/h) at 1/4 to 1/2 throttle for 10 seconds. 4. Drive the vehicle with a steady throttle at 45 mph (72 km/h) for 30 seconds. 5. Idle the vehicle in drive (neutral for manual transmissions) for 40 seconds. 6. Continue to drive the vehicle in city traffic at speeds between 25 and 40 mph (40-64 km/h) for 15 minutes. During the 15 minute drive cycle the following modes must be achieved: a. at least 5 stop and idle modes at 10 seconds each b. acceleration from idles at 1/4 to 1/2 throttle position, and c. choose 3 different speeds to do 1.5 minute steady state throttle drives. 343 7. Accelerate the vehicle up to between 45 and 60 mph (72-97 km/h). This should take approximately 5 minutes. 8. Drive vehicle and hold the throttle steady at the selected speed between 45 and 60 mph (72-97 km/h) for approximately 5 minutes. 9. Drive the vehicle for 5 minutes at varying speeds between 45 and 60 mph (72-97 km/h). 10. Bring the vehicle back to idle. Idle in drive for 40 seconds. 11. OBD II drive cycle has been completed. Vehicle can be turned off when convenient..."
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at FSB
DTC & Possible Causes for oxygen sensor, throttle position sensor, MAP sensor
Source: by foranythingautomotive.com
DTC 121, 122, 123, 124, 125 & DTC P0122, P0123 & P1121 in TSB 94-26-4; "...The following is a list of vehicle symptoms which have been associated with the TPS, but can also be related to other vehicle components. Check engine light, Stalls, quits, hesitation/stumble, fast idle; To minimize the replacement of good components, be advised that the following non-EEC areas may be the issue: Excessive blow-by, PCV malfunction, Vacuum leaks, Fuel pressure, Throttle sticking or linkage binding. MANY VOLTMETERS WILL AUTOMATICALLY CHANGE RANGES WHEN MEASURING TPS OUTPUT FROM IDLE TO WOT. WHEN A VOLTMETER IS USED TO MEASURE TPS OUTPUT FROM IDLE TO WOT, THE METER SCALES OR CHANGES RANGES AUTOMATICALLY. THERE MAY BE AN ERRONEOUS METER DISPLAY UNTIL THE VOLTMETER HAS LOCKED TO THE APPROPRIATE VOLTAGE READING. THE ERRONEOUS METER DISPLAY DOES NOT REPRESENT A DEFECTIVE TPS. NOTE: IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT THE "RANGE LOCK" FEATURE ON MANY METERS BE SET FOR CHECKING TPS VOLTAGE..."
Source: by Ford via tccoa.com
DTC 121, 122, 123, 124, 125 & DTC P0122, P0123 & P1121 in TSB 94-26-4; "...The following is a list of vehicle symptoms which have been associated with the TPS, but can also be related to other vehicle components. Check engine light, Stalls, quits, hesitation/stumble, fast idle; To minimize the replacement of good components, be advised that the following non-EEC areas may be the issue: Excessive blow-by, PCV malfunction, Vacuum leaks, Fuel pressure, Throttle sticking or linkage binding. MANY VOLTMETERS WILL AUTOMATICALLY CHANGE RANGES WHEN MEASURING TPS OUTPUT FROM IDLE TO WOT. WHEN A VOLTMETER IS USED TO MEASURE TPS OUTPUT FROM IDLE TO WOT, THE METER SCALES OR CHANGES RANGES AUTOMATICALLY. THERE MAY BE AN ERRONEOUS METER DISPLAY UNTIL THE VOLTMETER HAS LOCKED TO THE APPROPRIATE VOLTAGE READING. THE ERRONEOUS METER DISPLAY DOES NOT REPRESENT A DEFECTIVE TPS. NOTE: IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT THE "RANGE LOCK" FEATURE ON MANY METERS BE SET FOR CHECKING TPS VOLTAGE..."
Source: by Ford via Chilton
DTC 126-129, P0235-P0237; "...On gasoline engines, the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor senses atmospheric pressure to produce an electrical signal. The frequency of this signal varies with intake manifold pressure. The powertrain control module monitors this signal to determine altitude. The PCM then adjusts the E4OD shift schedule and EPC pressure for altitude. On diesel engines, the MAP sensor measures boost pressure. The PCM monitors this signal and adjusts EPC pressure. Symptoms: Firm shift feel, late shifts at altitude..."
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
DTC 211, P0340, P0341, P0344 & Possible Causes & Repair Procedures for E4OD from 1996 All F-Series and Bronco with E4OD Automatic Transmission Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
DTC 32, Driver Side Air Bag Circuit High Resistance or Open & Testing Advoce
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at FSB
DTC 32, Driver Side Air Bag Circuit High Resistance or Open; "...for a 93 Aerostar, from a Ford PCED/EVTM Service Disc... procedure is similar to Bronco...The diagnostic monitor measures the resistance across pin 10 (Circuit 615, GY/W) and pin 11 (Circuit 614, GY/O) every time the ignition switch is turned to the ON position. Normal resistance across these circuits is between 1.5 and 2.0 ohms. This resistance comes from the air bag itself (approximately 1.0 ohms) and the clockspring windings (approximately 0.25 to 0.5 ohms per winding, two windings in all). If the resistance across these two circuits exceeds 4.0 ohms, this indicates a high resistance and the diagnostic monitor will flash code 32.The connectors for the air bag and the clockspring have metal spring clips that act as shorting bars. These shorting bars are built into the plastic hardshell connectors. The shorting bars are designed to short Circuits 614 and 615 together when the connectors are not mated. Do not attempt to remove the air bag shorting bar and measure the resistance of the air bag..."
Source: by Ford via 96_4wdr at fte
DTC 62, 628 and/or 1728 Transmission Shifts Hard TSB 98-4-19 in 90-96
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at FSB
DTC 622, Shift Solenoid 2: Improper gear selection depending on failure mode and manual lever position; refer to the Shift Solenoid Operation Chart. May flash transmission control indicator lamp. Diagnostic Trouble Codes: 617, 618, 619, 622, P0755, P0781, P0782, P0783, P0756. (Output circuit check, generated only by electrical conditions. May also be generated by other non-electronic related transmission hardware condition.)
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at FSB
DTC 624, 625, P1746, P1747 The Electronic Pressure Control solenoid is a variable force solenoid. The variable-force type solenoid is an electro-hydraulic actuator combining a solenoid and a regulating valve. It supplies electronic pressure control which regulates transmission line pressure and line modulator pressure. This is done by producing resisting forces to the main regulator and the line modulator circuits. These two pressures control clutch application pressures. Failed off — maximum electronic pressure control pressure, harsh engagements and shifts. May flash transmission control indicator lamp. CAUTION: The electronic pressure control pressure output from the variable force solenoid is NOT adjustable. Any modification to the electronic pressure control solenoid will affect the transmission warranty. (*Output circuit check, generated only by electrical condition.) Possible causes, Damaged harness connector. Damaged EPC solenoid. Damaged MLP sensor. Intermittent harness continuity. Damaged PCM connector pins. Pin Point testing; READ MUCH MORE
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at FSB
DTC 626, 628, 643, 652, P0741, P0743, P1754; "...Coast Clutch Solenoid (CCS) 7M107; The Coast Clutch Solenoid provides coast clutch control by shifting the coast clutch shift valve. The solenoid is activated by pressing the transmission control switch or by selecting the 1 or 2 range with the transmission gearshift selector lever. In manual 1 and 2, the coast clutch is controlled by the solenoid and also hydraulically as a fail-safe to ensure engine braking. In reverse, the coast clutch is controlled hydraulically and the solenoid is not on. NOTE: On certain applications, the coast clutch is controlled by the PCM in the overdrive position (TCS OFF) in gears 1, 2, and 3. Symptoms: Failed on â Third gear engine braking with (D) range selected. Failed off â No third gear engine braking in overdrive cancel..."
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
DTC 636, P1711 TFT Sensor Out of On-Board Diagnostics Range; 637, 638, P0712, P0713 TFT Sensor Circuit Open/Grounded; 657, P1783 Transmission Overtemp Indicated (149°C [300°F]); Transmission Oil Temperature Sensor (TOT) Pinpoint Test & Connector Pin-Out Diagram from 1996 All F-Series and Bronco with E4OD Automatic Transmission Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
DTC 637 - TOT sensor circuit above maximum voltage possible causes: Damaged TOT sensor. Open harness circuit(s). Damaged processor. or the transmission was overheated. The transmission fluid temperature sensor is located on the solenoid body assembly in the transmission sump. It is a temperature-sensitive device called a thermistor. The resistance value of the transmission fluid temperature sensor will vary with temperature change. The powertrain control module monitors voltage across the transmission fluid temperature sensor to determine the temperature of the transmission fluid. The powertrain control module uses this signal to determine whether a cold start shift schedule is necessary. The cold start shift schedule lowers shift speeds to allow for the reduced performance of cold engine operation. The powertrain control module also uses the transmission fluid temperature sensor input to adjust electronic pressure control pressure for temperature effects and inhibit torque converter clutch operation during the warm-up period. Symptoms: Torque converter clutch and stabilized shift schedule happens too soon after a cold start. Codes P1783 or 657 indicate transmission fluid temperature exceeds 132°C (270° F), results in increased EPC pressure and torque converter clutch engagement. May flash transmission control indicator lamp. Diagnostic Trouble Codes: 636, 637, 638, 657, P0712, P0713, P1711, P1783.
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at FSB
DTC P0102 - "...Mass Air Flow (MAF) Circuit Low Input; The MAF sensor circuit is monitored by the PCM for low air flow (or voltage) input through the comprehensive component monitor (CCM). If during key ON engine running the air flow (or voltage) changes below a minimum calibrated limit, the test fails. MAF sensor disconnectedMAF circuit open to PCM VPWR open to MAF sensor PWR GND open to MAF sensor MAF RTN circuit open to PCM MAF circuit shorted to GND Intake air leak (near MAF sensor) A closed [throttle indication throttle position (TP) sensor system] Damaged MAF sensor Damaged PCM A MAF V PID (MAF PID) reading less than 0.23 volts (Refer to equivalent grams/second chart in GO to Pinpoint Test DC ) in continuous memory or key ON and engine running indicates a hard fault..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0102 Mass Air Flow (MAF) Circuit Low Input
Source: by obd-codes.com
DTC P0103 - Mass Air Flow (MAF) Circuit High Input; "...The MAF sensor circuit is monitored by the PCM for high air flow (or voltage) input through the comprehensive component monitor (CCM). If during key ON engine OFF or key ON engine running the air flow (or voltage) changes above a maximum calibrated limit, the test fails. MAF sensor screen is blocked MAF circuit shorted to VPWR Damaged MAF sensor Damaged PCM A MAF V PID (MAF PID) reading less than 4.6 volts (Refer to equivalent grams/second chart in. GO to Pinpoint Test DC ) in continuous memory or key ON and engine running indicates a hard fault..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0106 - Barometric (BARO) Pressure Sensor Circuit Performance' "... Baro sensor input to the PCM is monitored and is not within the calibrated value. Slow responding BARO sensor Electrical circuit failure Damaged BARO sensor Damaged PCM VREF voltage should be between 4.0 and 6.0 volts PID reading is in frequency..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0107 - BARO Sensor Low Voltage Detected; "...Sensor operating voltage is less than 5.0 volts (VREF), as a result it failed below the minimum allowable calibrated parameter. Open in the circuit, or short to ground VREF circuit open, or short to ground Damaged BARO sensor Damaged PCM VREF should be greater than 4.0 volts PID reading is in frequency..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0108 - BARO Sensor High Voltage Detected; "... Sensor operating voltage is greater than 5.0 volts (VREF), as a result it failed above maximum allowable calibrated parameter. VREF shorted to VWPR BARO signal shorted to VPWR Damaged BARO sensor Damaged PCM VREF should be less than 6.0 volts. PID reading is in frequency..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0109 - BARO Sensor Circuit Intermittent; "... The sensor signal to the PCM is failing intermittently. Loose electrical connection Damaged BARO sensor Check harness and connection. P0112 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Circuit Low Input Indicates the sensor signal is less than Self-Test minimum. The IAT sensor minimum is 0.2 volts or 121°C (250°F). Grounded circuit in harness Damaged sensor Improper harness connection Damaged PCM Using signal simulation, disconnect sensor and simulate 1.0V on sensor signal circuit. Simulated 1.0V signal and scan PID voltage value should be similar. If voltage is similar check sensor, if voltage is not similar check related circuit and PCM..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0113 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Circuit High Input; "... Indicates the sensor signal is greater than Self-Test maximum. The IAT sensor maximum is 4.6 volts or -50°C (-46°F). Open circuit in harness Sensor signal short to power Damaged sensor Improper harness connection Damaged PCM Using signal simulation, disconnect sensor and simulate 1.0V on sensor signal circuit. Simulated 1.0V signal and scan PID voltage value should be similar. If voltage is similar check sensor, if voltage is not similar check related circuit and PCM..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0117 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) "Circuit Low Input Indicates the sensor signal is less than Self-Test minimum. The ECT sensor minimum is 0.2 volts or 121°C (250°F). Note on some vehicles that are not equipped with an ECT sensor, CHT can be used and can set this DTC. Grounded circuit in harness"
Source: by zx3 focus racer at focaljet.com
DTC P0117 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Circuit Low Input; "... Indicates the sensor signal is less than Self-Test minimum. The ECT sensor minimum is 0.2 volts or 121°C (250°F). Note on some vehicles that are not equipped with an ECT sensor, CHT can be used and can set this DTC. Grounded circuit in harness Damaged sensor Improper harness connection Damaged PCM Using signal simulation, disconnect sensor and simulate 1.0V on sensor signal circuit. Simulated 1.0V signal and scan PID voltage value should be similar. If voltage is similar check sensor, if voltage is not similar check related circuit and PCM..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0118 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Circuit High Input; "... Indicates the sensor signal is greater than Self-Test maximum. The ECT sensor maximum is 4.6 volts or -50°C (-46 °F). Note on some vehicles that are not equipped with an ECT sensor, CHT can be used and can set this DTC. Open circuit in harness Sensor signal short to power Damaged PCM Improper harness connection Damaged sensor Using signal simulation, disconnect sensor and simulate 1.0V on sensor signal circuit. Simulated 1.0V signal and scan PID voltage value should be similar. If voltage is similar check sensor, if voltage is not similar check related circuit and PCM..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0121 - Throttle Position (TP) Circuit Performance Problem; "... The TP sensor circuit is monitored by the PCM for a none closed throttle position at idle. If key ON engine running self-test terminates upon placing the transmission range selector in gear (DRIVE or REVERSE) or when closing the throttle (idle) after opening it (in PARK or NEUTRAL) the TP closed throttle position is not attained, the test fails. Binding throttle linkage Damaged throttle body TP circuit open to PCM Damaged TP sensor SIG RTN circuit open to TP sensor Drive vehicle, bring to a stop, turn key OFF. Start vehicle, run key ON engine running self-test at idle. Access KOER diagnostic trouble codes on scan tool..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0122 - Throttle Position (TP) Circuit Low Input; "... The TP sensor circuit is monitored by the PCM for a low TP rotation angle (or voltage) input through the comprehensive component monitor (CCM). If during key ON engine OFF or key ON engine running the TP rotation angle (or voltage) changes below a minimum calibrated limit, the test fails. TP sensor not seated properly TP circuit open to PCM VREF open to TP sensor TP circuit short to GND Damaged TP sensor Damaged PCM A TP PID (TP V PID) reading less than 3.42% (0.17 volt) in key ON engine OFF, continuous memory or key ON engine running indicates a hard fault..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0123 - Throttle Position (TP) Circuit High Input; "... The TP sensor circuit is monitored by the PCM for a high TP rotation angle (or voltage) input through the comprehensive component monitor (CCM). If during key ON engine OFF or key ON engine running the TP rotation angle (or voltage) changes above maximum calibrated limit, the test fails. TP sensor not seated properly TP circuit short to PWR VREF short to PWR SIG RTN circuit open to TP sensor Damaged TP sensor Damaged PCM A TP PID (TP V PID) reading greater than 93% (4.65 volts) in key ON engine OFF, continuous memory or key ON engine running indicates a hard fault..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0125 - Insufficient Coolant Temperature; "... For Closed Loop Fuel Control Indicates the ECT or CHT sensor has not achieved the required temperature level to enter closed loop operating conditions within a specified amount of time after starting engine. Insufficient warm up time Low engine coolant level Leaking or stuck open thermostat Malfunctioning ECT sensor Malfunctioning CHT sensor Refer to Thermostat Monitor in Section 1, Description and Operation, for system information..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0125 Insufficient Coolant Temperature For Closed Loop Fuel Control "...Indicates the ECT or CHT sensor has not achieved the required temperature level to enter closed loop operating conditions within a specified amount of time after starting engine. Insufficient warm up time; Insufficient warm up time Low engine coolant level Leaking or stuck open thermostat Malfunctioning ECT sensor..." miesk5 Note; Remember to have engine @ Normal Operating Temperature before doing the KOER portion
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0131 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Out of Range Low Voltage (HO2S-11); ".. The HO2S sensor is monitored for a negative voltage known as characteristic shift downward (CSD). If the sensor is thought to be switching from 0 volts to -1 volts during testing, the PCM will use this input and remain in fuel control. Contaminated HO2S (water, fuel, etc) Crossed HO2S signal/signal return wiring..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0133 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Slow Response (HO2S-11) The HO2S monitor checks the HO2S sensor frequency and amplitude. If during testing, the frequency and amplitude were to fall below a calibrated limit, the code will set; Possible Causes: Electrical: · Shorted/open wiring · PCM Induction System: · MAF sensor (On 4-cylinder engines, if P0133 is present, this could be caused by a MAF issue - on 6- and 8-cylinder engines, this could only be a MAF issue if P0133 and P0153 are both present) · Inlet air leaks (unmetered air) Fuel Concerns: · Poor fuel quality Base Engine: · Exhaust leaks (upstream or near HO2S) HO2S Concerns: · Contaminated HO2S sensor (contamination from the use of silicone-based cleaners and sealants, leaded fuel, excessive oil consumption - Deteriorating HO2S sensor; OBD II Response Rate Monitor: The OBD II Response Rate Monitor (P0133/P0153) is only run at vehicle speeds between approximately 50-95 km/h (30-60 mph), during steady-state conditions. The test lasts approximately 6 seconds. Therefore, P0133/P0153 cannot be diagnosed at idle in the repair bay...Most replace the O2 Sensor; but ck for wiring/connector/harness damage and other likely and no $ parts replacement checks 1st; incl testing the sensor ckt; fuses, heater ckt, etc. Fords naming convention is that bank one is the same bank as where the number one cylinder is sensor one is before the cat sensor two is after the cat.
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
DTC P0133 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Slow Response (HO2S-11); "... The HEGO Monitor checks the HO2S Sensor frequency and amplitude. If during testing the frequency and amplitude were to fall below a calibrated limit, the test will fail. Contaminated HO2S sensor. Exhaust leaks. Shorted /open wiring. Improper fueling. MAF sensor. Deteriorating HO2S sensor. Inlet air leaks. Access HO2S test results from the Generic OBD-II menu to verify DTC..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0135 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-11)';"... During testing the HO2S Heaters are checked for opens/shorts and excessive current draw. The test fails when current draw exceeds a calibrated limit and/or an open or short is detected. Short to VPWR in harness or HO2S. Water in harness connector. Open VPWR circuit. Open GND circuit. Low battery voltage. Corrosion or poor mating terminals and wiring Damaged HO2S heater. Damaged PCM. wiring. Damaged HO2S heater. Damaged PCM..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0135 - HO2S Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-11); passenger side in exhaust manifold; Possible Causes; Blown fuse, Short to VPWR in harness or HO2S, Water in harness connector, Open VPWR or GND circuit, Low battery voltage, Poor electrical connections from PCM to HO2S sensor, HO2S heater, PCM
Source: by Ford via v8sho.com
DTC P0136 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-12); "... The downstream HO2S sensor(s) are continuously checked for maximum and minimum voltages. The test fails when the voltages fail to meet the calibrated limits. Pinched, shorted, and corroded wiring and pins. Crossed sensor wires. Exhaust leaks. Contaminated or damaged sensor..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0141 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-125) See DTC P0135; P0151 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Out of Range Low Voltage (HO2S-21) See DTC P0131; P0153 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Slow Response (HO2S-21) See DTC P0133; P0155 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-21) See DTC P0135; P0156 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-22) See DTC P0136; P0161 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-22) See DTC P0135 ..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0141 - HO2S Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-12); passenger side between cats; See Possible Causes for DTC P0135; Blown fuse, Short to VPWR in harness or HO2S, Water in harness connector, Open VPWR or GND circuit, Low battery voltage, Poor electrical connections from PCM to HO2S sensor, HO2S heater, PCM
Source: by Ford via v8sho.com
DTC P0141; Bank 1, Sensor 2 (passenger side between cats (or behind the second one in a California vehicle); Short to VPWR in harness or HO2S, Water in harness connector, Open VPWR circuit, Open GND circuit, Low battery voltage, Corrosion or poor mating terminals and wiring, Damaged HO2S heater, Damaged PCM
Source: by diydiagnostics.com via web.archive.org
DTC P0161 - HO2S Sensor Heater Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-22); driver in exhaust manifold; See Possible Causes for DTC P0135; Blown fuse, Short to VPWR in harness or HO2S, Water in harness connector, Open VPWR or GND circuit, Low battery voltage, Poor electrical connections from PCM to HO2S sensor, HO2S heater, PCM
Source: by Ford via v8sho.com
DTC P0171 & P0174 Lean Troubleshooting; "...These codes commonly occur on many Ford vehicles, and are set when the powertrain control module (PCM) sees the air/fuel mixture is running too lean (too much air, not enough fuel). Unmetered air can enter the engine through a vacuum leak, a dirty airflow sensor (MAF) that is not reading airflow accurately, an EGR valve is not closing (DPFE) and is leaking exhaust into the intake manifold, an EGR valve that is allowing too much flow (because the EGR differential pressure sensor that monitors EGR flow is faulty and is under-reporting EGR flow). If the problem is not enough fuel, the underling cause may be a weak fuel pump, restricted fuel filter, leaky fuel pressure regulator or dirty fuel injectors..."
Source: by Larry C at AA1Car.com
DTC P0171 - System to Lean (Bank 1); "... The Adaptive Fuel Strategy continuously monitors fuel delivery hardware. The test fails when the adaptive fuel tables reach a rich calibrated limit. For lean and rich DTCs: Fuel system Excessive fuel pressure. Leaking/contaminated fuel injectors. Leaking fuel pressure regulator. Low fuel pressure or running out of fuel. Vapor recovery system. Induction system: Air leaks after the MAF. Vacuum Leaks. PCV system. Improperly seated engine oil dipstick. EGR system: Leaking gasket. Stuck EGR valve. Leaking diaphragm or EVR. Base Engine: Oil overfill. Cam timing. Cylinder compression. Exhaust leaks before or near the HO2Ss ..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0171 System to Lean (Bank 1) The Adaptive Fuel Strategy continuously monitors fuel delivery hardware. The test fails when the adaptive fuel tables reach a rich calibrated limit. For lean and rich DTCs: read more
Source: by zx3 focus racer at forums.focaljet.com
DTC P0171, P0172, P0174 & P0175 & Possible Causes
Source: by Ford via Vincent T. C.
DTC P0171, P0172, P0174 & P0175, P1130, P1131, P1132, P1150, P1151, P1152; 181, 189 (Fuel system lean, Bank 1 or 2), 179, 188 (Fuel system rich, Bank 1 or 2); 171, 172, 173 (HO2S11 lack of switching, Bank 1); 175, 176, 177 (HO2S21 lack of switching, Bank 2); 184, 185 (MAF higher/lower than expected); 186, 187 (Injector pulse width higher/lower than expected) & Possible Causes in MAF Contamination TSB 98-23-10 for 94-96; NOTE: THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE MAY ALSO BE USED TO DIAGNOSE VEHICLES THAT DO NOT HAVE FUEL SYSTEM/HO2S SENSOR DTCs. Symptoms: Lack of Power, Spark Knock/Detonation, Buck/Jerk Hesitation/Surge on Acceleration
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at FSB
DTC P0172 - System to Rich (Bank 1); "...The Adaptive Fuel Strategy continuously monitors the fuel delivery hardware. The test fails when the adaptive fuel tables reach a lean calibrated limit. See Possible Causes for DTC P0171 ..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0174 - System to Lean (Bank 2); "... The Adaptive Fuel Strategy continuously monitors the fuel delivery hardware. The test fails when the adaptive fuel tables reach a rich calibrated limit. See Possible Causes for DTC P0171 ..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0174; "...Basically this means that an oxygen sensor in bank 2 detected a lean condition (too much oxygen in the exhaust). On V6/V8/V10 engines, Bank 2 is generally the side of the engine that doesn't have cylinder #1 (driver's side); The MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor is dirty or faulty. Note: The use of "oiled" air filters can cause the MAF to become dirty if the filter is over-oiled. There could be a vacuum leak downstream of the MAF sensor..." READ MORE
Source: by obd-codes.com
DTC P0175 - System too Rich (Bank 2); "... The Adaptive Fuel Strategy continuously monitors the fuel delivery hardware. The test fails when the adaptive fuel tables reach a lean calibrated limit. See Possible Causes for DTC P0171. A SHRTFT-1,2 PID value between -25% to +35% and a LONGFT-1,2 PID value between -35% to +35% is acceptable. Reading beyond these values indicate a failure..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0300 Random; Multiple Cylinder Misfire Detected; Symptoms, Causes & Possible Solutions
Source: by obd-codes.com
DTC P0300, P0302, P030X, Random; Multiple Cylinder Misfire Detected; Symptoms, Causes & Possible Solutions
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
DTC P0301 through P0310 - Misfire Detection Monitor; "... The misfire detection monitor is designed to monitor engine misfire and identify the specific cylinder in which the misfire has occurred. Misfire is defined as lack of combustion in a cylinder due to absence of spark, poor fuel metering, poor compression, or any other cause. Ignition system Fuel injectors Running out of fuel EVAP canister purge valve Fuel pressure Evaporative emission system Base engine The MIL will blink once per second when a misfire is detected severe enough to cause catalyst damage. If the MIL is on steady state, due to a misfire, this will indicate the threshold for emissions was exceeded and cause the vehicle to fail an inspection and maintenance tailpipe test..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0325, P0326, P0330, P0331 Knock Sensor
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0401 - EGR Flow Insufficient Detected ; "...The EGR system is monitored during steady state driving conditions while the EGR is commanded on. The test fails when the signal from the DPF EGR sensor indicates that EGR flow is less than the desired minimum. Vacuum supply EGR valve stuck closed EGR valve leaks vacuum EGR flow path restricted EGRVR circuit shorted to PWR VREF open to D.P.F. EGR sensor D.P.F. EGR sensor downstream hose off or plugged EGRVR circuit open to PCM VPWR open to EGRVR solenoid D.P.F. EGR sensor hoses both off D.P.F. EGR sensor hoses reversed Damaged EGR orifice tube Damaged EGRVR solenoid Damaged PCM Perform KOER self-test and look for DTC P1408 as an indication of a hard fault. If P1408 is not present, look for contamination, restrictions, leaks, and intermittents..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0401 EGR Flow Insufficient Detected Discussion; "... At the DPFE sensor VREF is the Br/Wh wire, Signal Return (ground) is Gy/Rd and the PFE signal is Br/LG. VREF should be 5V or there abouts. At a hot idle your PFE should read usually just under 1V, with the EGR open it should read approx 4V if EGR is actually flowing. I dont think there is any way to easily test the PFE off the truck. I'd start by applying vacuum to the EGR and see if the idle changes....that way you'll know if the EGR is capable of flowing. This is what the manual says about a P0401; Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) P0401 indicates that Continuous Memory Self-Test has detected insufficient EGR flow. Possible causes: Fault in vacuum supply to EGR vacuum regulator solenoid. EGR valve stuck closed or iced. EGR valve diaphragm leaks. EGR valve or flow path restricted. EGR vacuum hose off, plugged or leaks. VPWR circuit open to EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid. EVR circuit to PCM open. EVR circuit to PCM shorted to PWR. Differential Pressure Feedback EGR (D.P.F. EGR) sensor pressure hoses both connected improperly. D.P.F. EGR sensor pressure hoses reversed. D.P.F. EGR sensor VREF circuit open. Downstream pressure hose off. Downstream pressure hose plugged. Damaged orifice tube assembly. Damaged EGR Vacuum Regulator solenoid. Damaged D.P.F. EGR sensor. Damaged PCM..." Read more
Source: by Racerguy at fte
DTC P0401 EGR Flow Insufficient Detected Possible Causes; "...DTC P0401 is for exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) insufficient flow detected. This most likely means one or more of the following has happened: The EGR valve may not be opening due to a lack of vacuum; There is a blockage in the EGR (most likely carbon buildup); The DPFE sensor is faulty and needs to be replaced; The EGR valve is faulty. In fixing this code, it is quite common for people to just replace the EGR valve only to have the OBD code return. However, just like many other DTCs, the problem is not always obvious and the EGR valve is not always the culprit..." READ MUCH MORE
Source: by Gateway Clean Air Program dnr.mo.gov
DTC P0402 - EGR Flow Excessive Detected. "...The EGR system is monitored for undesired EGR flow during idle. The EGR monitor looks at the DPF EGR signal at idle and compares it to the stored signal measured during key ON and engine OFF. The test fails when the signal at idle is greater than at key ON engine OFF by a calibrated amount. EGR valve stuck open..." READ MORE
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
DTC P0402 - EGR Flow Excessive Detected; "... The EGR system is monitored for undesired EGR flow during idle. The EGR monitor looks at the DPF EGR signal at idle and compares it to the stored signal measured during key ON and engine OFF. The test fails when the signal at idle is greater than at key ON engine OFF by a calibrated amount. EGR valve stuck open Plugged EGR vacuum regulator solenoid vent Plugged EGR tube Slow responding D.P.F. EGR sensor Damaged DPF EGR sensor Improper vacuum hose connection Plugged vacuum hoses EGRVR circuit shorted to ground Damaged EGR vacuum regulator solenoid Damaged PCM A DPFEGR PID reading that is greater at idle than during key ON and engine OFF by 0.5 volt or a rough engine idle, may indicate a hard fault..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0411 & P0412 - Secondary Air Injection (AIR) system upstream flow; P0412 - Secondary Air Injection System (AIR) circuit malfunction The PCM attempts to control when air is injected in the exhaust. The DTC indicates a Secondary Air injection system AIR circuit fault. AIR circuit open ..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0411 & P1411; "... indicates Secondary Air not detected. In order to test the pump, it must be capable of driving the HO2S lean; NOTE: Some applications have one or two Air Diverter (AIRD) valves. Key off. l Visually inspect EAP hoses from the EAP to the AIRD valves. l Inspect air hose for cracks, binding and obstructions. l Are EAP hoses OK? Yes GO to «HM8». No SERVICE or REPLACE damaged parts. COMPLETE PCM Reset to clear DTCs (REFER to Section 2A, «Powertrain Control Module (PCM) Reset»). RERUN «Quick Test; HM9 CHECK FOR VACUUM AT AIRD VALVES l Key off. l Reconnect PCM. l Disconnect vacuum control line from the AIRD valve(s). l Key on, engine running. l After a 5 second delay, vacuum will be present between 30-90 seconds. l Is vacuum present at the AIRD valve(s)? Yes GO to «HM10». No GO to «HM30
Source: by Fishallot at FSB
DTC P0411 indicates that Secondary Air is not being diverted when requested; "...Possible causes: Vacuum hoses damaged. AIRB/AIRD valve inoperative. Air Pump inoperative. AIRB/AIRD solenoids damaged. (Location pic in a 5.8; miesk5 Note; same location as in my 96 5.0. Test; Key off. Disconnect both AIRB/AIRD solenoid connectors and measure both solenoid resistances. each resistance should be between 50 and 100 ohms. Visually inspect vacuum lines for disconnects in the AIR system.Visually inspect for proper vacuum line routing. Refer to VECI decal.Visually inspect Air Pump for broken or loose Air Pump Belt. The up-stream and downstream functional air flow test is performed during idle, once per engine start-up &only after all HO2S Monitor tests have been successfully performed. The flow test relies upon the up-stream & down-stream HO2S to detect the presence of additional air in the exhaust when introduced by the Secondary Air Injection system. The DTCs associated with this test are DTCs P0411 and P1411..."
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at Ford Bronco Zone Forums
DTC P0420 - Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 1); "... Indicates Bank 1 catalyst system efficiency is below the acceptable threshold Use of leaded fuel Damaged HO2S Malfunctioning ECT High fuel pressure Damaged exhaust manifold Damaged catalytic converter Oil contamination Cylinder misfiring Downstream HO2S wires improperly connected Damaged exhaust system pipe Damaged muffler/tailpipe assembly Retarded spark timing Compare HO2S upstream & downstream switch rate. Under normal closed loop fuel conditions, high efficiency catalysts have oxygen storage which makes the switching frequency of the downstream HO2S quite slow compared to the upstream HO2S. As catalyst efficiency deteriorates, its ability to store oxygen declines and the downstream HO2S signal begins to switch more rapidly approaching the switching rate of the upstream HO2S. Once beyond an acceptable limit the DTC is set..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0420 Catalyst System Efficiency below Threshold (Bank 1); Symptoms, Causes & Possible Solutions
Source: by obd-codes.com
DTC P0420, P0430, P0421; Testing For a Bad Convertor; General
Source: by Rick S at BAT Auto
DTC P0420, P0430; Testing For a Bad Converter; General; "...While other testing methods are effective, the most definitive test for exhaust back pressure is to place an adaptor in the upstream oxygen sensor port and attach a low-pressure gauge of at least 15 psi capacity. At idle, the pressure should be less than one psi. During a snap-throttle test, the pressure generally shouldn’t exceed 4 psi..." in Volume IV, Issue I . March, 2010
Source: by easterncatalytic.com
DTC P0430 - Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 2); "... Indicates Bank 2 catalyst system efficiency is below the acceptable threshold. Use of leaded fuel Damaged HO2S Malfunctioning ECT High fuel pressure Damaged exhaust manifold Damaged catalytic converter Oil contamination Cylinder misfiring Downstream HO2S wires improperly connected Damaged exhaust system pipe Damaged muffler/tailpipe assembly Retarded spark timing Compare HO2S upstream & downstream switch rate. Under normal closed loop fuel conditions, high efficiency catalysts have oxygen storage which makes the switching frequency of the downstream HO2S quite slow compared to the upstream HO2S. As catalyst efficiency deteriorates, its ability to store oxygen declines and the downstream HO2S signal begins to switch more rapidly approaching the switching rate of the upstream HO2S. Once beyond an acceptable limit the DTC is set..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0431 Warm Up Catalyst Efficiency below Threshold
Source: by obd-codes.com
DTC P0440 & Possible Causes; "If the gas cap is not tight or the tank is filled while the key is on or the engine is idling, it can trigger a false P0440 code causing the MIL light to come on; or: The purge solenoid has failed or: The canister is plugged and not working properly..."
Source: by obd-codes.com
DTC P0442, P0443, P0455, P0456, P0457 Possible Causes
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0442, P0455, P1450, P0455, P1450, P1455, P1442, P1443, P1444, P1445, P1455 & Possible Causes; Vapor Management Valve
Source: by Ford motorcraftservice.com
DTC P0443, P1443, P1444, P1445, P1451; Canister Purge (CANP) solenoid output circuit is checked for opens and shorts internally in the PCM by monitoring the status of the duty-cycled output driver. When the output driver is fully energized, or de-energized, the feedback circuit voltage should respond high or low accordingly (P0443). The Purge Flow Sensor is check for circuit continuity (P1444, P1445) The CANP solenoid functional check uses a Purge Flow Sensor (PFS) to check for adequate purge flow. The PFS voltage is checked when the solenoid valve is normally open (> 75%), then checked when the solenoid valve is commanded closed (0%). Too low a difference between the voltages indicates inadequate canister purge flow or a PFS malfunction (P1443)..." read more
Source: by Ford motorcraftservice.com
DTC P0443: EVAP Control System Canister Purge Valve Circuit Malfunction; "The PCM monitors the state of the EVAP canister purge valve circuit output driver. The test fails when the signal moves outside the minimum or maximum limit for the commanded state; VPWR circuit open, EVAP canister purge valve circuit shorted to GND, Damaged EVAP canister purge valve, EVAP canister purge valve circuit open, EVAP canister purge valve circuit shorted to VPWR, Damaged PCM; To verify normal function, monitor the EVAP canister purge valve signal PID EVAPPDC (or EVMV for electronic valve) and the signal voltage (PCM control side). With the valve closed, EVAPPDC will indicate 0% duty cycle (0 mA for EVMV) and the voltage approximately equal to battery voltage. When the valve is commanded fully open, EVAPPDC will indicate /100%.jpg duty cycle (1000 mA for EVMV) and a voltage drop of 3 volts minimum is normal. Output test mode may be used to switch output ON/OFF to verify function..."
Source: by miesk5 at Ford Bronco Zone Forums
DTC P0455 "...is an EVAP system gross leak. The vent solenoid will usually not set this code because there is enough of a restriction to set a P0456 or P0442. P0455 is usually generated by a failed Vapor management valve located on the firewall near the brake booster, or a cut/broken hose to the tank or carbon cannister. (you have already covered the gas cap) Check to make sure you have vacuum and power to the to the valve first. Test for vacuum at the small vacuum line which is the control source and the large hose wwhich is the operating vacuum for the system. there is a two wire electrical connector on the valve as well. One wire should have 12 volts and the other is ground controlled by the PCM. Check the ground circuit by turning the valve on while checking for a complete circuit at the connector when valve is commanded on. Inspect all evap lines and cannister for damage.. You will need a scan tool capable of taking command of output devices. Next, with engine running, close the cannister vent solenoid and open the Vapor management valve while monitoring the fuel tank pressure sensor. voltage should drop form roughly 2.5 volts to 1 volt or less. If not, a gross leak is present and you will need a smoke generator to locate the leak. If it does, then close vapor management valve and monitor fuel tank pressure voltage. It should not increase more than 1 volt in a minute. If it does, a small leak is present. If no leaks are found then Vapor management valve is suspect..."
Source: by tjzz4 at truckforum.org
DTC P0500 Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Malfunction; "... Indicates the powertrain control module (PCM) detected an error in the vehicle speed information. Vehicle speed data is received from either the vehicle speed sensor (VSS), transfer case speed sensor (TCSS), anti-lock brake system (ABS) control module, generic electronic module (GEM), or central timer module (CTM). If the engine rpm is above the torque converter stall speed (automatic transmission) and engine load is high, it can be inferred that the vehicle must be moving. If there is insufficient vehicle speed data input, a malfunction is indicated and a DTC is set. On most vehicle applications the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) will be triggered when this DTC is set. Open in VSS+/VSS- harness circuit. Open in TCSS signal or TCSS signal return harness circuit. Short to GND in VSS harness circuit. Short to GND in TCSS harness circuit. Short to PWR in VSS harness circuit. Short to PWR in TCSS harness circuit. Open or short in the vehicle speed circuit(s) (VSC) between the PCM and appropriate control module. Damaged VSS or TCSS. Damaged wheel speed sensors. Damaged wheel speed sensor harness circuits. Damage in module(s) connected to VSC/VSS circuit. Damage drive mechanism for VSS or TCSS. Diagnostic Aids: - Monitor VSS PID while driving vehicle. This DTC is set when the PCM detects a sudden loss of VSS signal over a period of time. If vehicle speed data is lost, check source of where vehicle speed signal originates. Note TCSS does not have a PID, circuitry frequency must be checked for sudden loss of sensor signal..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0500 Vehicle Speed Sensor Malfunction
Source: by obd-codes.com
DTC P0500; "...The Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) is an analog input that is checked for rationality. If the engine rpm is above the torque converter stall speed and engine load is high, it can be inferred that the vehicle must be moving. If there is insufficient output from the VSS sensor, a malfunction is indicated (P0500)...."
Source: by Ford
DTC P0501 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Range/ Performance; "... Indicates the powertrain control module (PCM) detected an error in the vehicle speed information. This DTC is set the same way as P0500, however the malfunction indicator lamp (MIL) is not triggered. Refer to possible causes for P0500. Refer to diagnostic aids for P0500..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0503 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Intermittent Indicates poor or noisy VSS performance. Vehicle speed data is received from either the vehicle speed sensor (VSS), transfer case speed sensor (TCSS), anti-lock brake system (ABS) control module, generic electronic module (GEM), or central timer module (CTM). Noisy VSS/TCSS input signal from Radio Frequency Interference/Electro- Magnetic Interference (RFI/EMI) external sources such as ignition components or charging circuit. Damaged VSS or driven gears. Damaged TCSS. Damaged wiring harness or connectors. Malfunction in module(s) or circuit connected to VSS/TCSS circuit. After market add-on. Monitor VSS PID while driving vehicle, check for intermittent vehicle speed indication. Verify ignition and charging system are functioning Verify ignition and charging system are functioning correctly. Check for good VSS (-) to ground..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0505 - Idle Air Control System Malfunction; "... The PCM attempts to control engine speed during KOER self-test. The test fails when the desired rpm could not be reached or controlled during the self-test. IAC circuit open VPWR to IAC solenoid open IAC circuit shorted to PWR Air inlet is plugged Damaged IAC valve Damaged PCM The IAC solenoid resistance is from 6 to 13 ohms..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0552 - Power Steering Pressure (PSP) Sensor Circuit Malfunction; "... The PSP sensor input signal to the PCM is continuously monitored.The test fails when the signal is open or shorted to ground. PSP sensor damaged SIG RTN circuit open or shorted VREF circuit open or shorted PSP sensor signal circuit open or shorted Damaged PCM The DTC indicates the PSP sensor circuit is open or shorted to ground..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0552 - Power Steering Pressure (PSP) Sensor Circuit Malfunction; "... The PSP sensor input signal to the PCM is continuously monitored.The test fails when the signal is open or shorted to ground. PSP sensor damaged SIG RTN circuit open or shorted VREF circuit open or shorted PSP sensor signal circuit open or shorted Damaged PCM The DTC indicates the PSP sensor circuit is open or shorted to ground..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0553 - Power Steering Pressure (PSP) Sensor Circuit Malfunction; "... The PSP sensor input signal to PCM is continuously monitored. The test fails when the signal is shorted to power. PSP sensor damagedSIG RTN circuit shorted to power VREF circuit shorted to power PSP sensor signal circuit shorted to power Damaged PCM The code indicates the PSP sensor circuit is shorted to power..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P0707, P0708; "...The Analog Transmission Range (TR) sensor provides a single analog input to the PCM. The voltage corresponds to the driver-selected gear position (Park, Rev, Neutral, OD, 2, 1). This input is checked for opens and shorts. (P0707, P0708)..."
Source: by Ford
DTC P1000; "...P1000 - Monitor Testing Not Complete The on board diagnostic II (OBD II) monitors are performed during the OBD II Drive Cycle. The DTC will be stored in continuous memory if any of the OBD II monitors do not complete. Vehicle is new from the factory Battery or PCM had recently been disconnected An OBD II monitor failure had occurred before completion of an OBD II drive cycle PCM DTCs have recently been cleared with a scan tool PTO circuit is shorted to VPWR or B+ or PTO is on during testing The DTC does not need to be cleared from the PCM except to pass an inspection/maintenance test..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1100 - Mass Air Flow (MAF) Sensor Intermittent; "... The MAF sensor circuit is monitored by the PCM for sudden voltage (or air flow) input change through the comprehensive component monitor (CCM). If during the last 40 warm-up cycles in key ON engine running the PCM detects a voltage (or air flow) change beyond the minimum or maximum calibrated limit, a continuous memory diagnostic trouble code (DTC) is stored. Poor continuity through the MAF sensor connectors Poor continuity through the MAF sensor harness Intermittent open or short inside the MAF sensor. While accessing the MAF V PID on the scan tool, lightly tap on the MAF sensor or wiggle the MAF sensor connector and harness. If the MAF V PID suddenly changes below 0.23 volt or above 4.60 volts, an intermittent fault is indicated..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1101 - Mass Air Flow (MAF) Sensor Out of Self-Test Range; "... The MAF sensor circuit is monitored by the PCM for an out of range air flow (or voltage) input. If during key ON engine OFF the air flow (or voltage) reading is greater than (GO to Pinpoint Test DC to refer to equivalent grams/second chart [0.27 volt]), the test fails. Likewise, if during key ON engine running an air flow (or voltage) reading is not within (GO to Pinpoint Test DC to refer to equivalent grams/second chart [0.46 volt to 2.44 volts]), the test fails. Likewise, if during key ON engine running an air flow (or voltage) reading is not within (GO to Pinpoint Test DC to refer to equivalent grams/second chart [0.46 volt to 2.44 volts]), the test fails. Low battery charge MAF sensor partially connected MAF sensor contamination PWR GND open to MAF sensor MAF RTN circuit open to PCM Damaged MAF sensor Damaged PCM A MAF V PID reading greater than 0.27 volts (KOEO) or a MAF V PID reading outside the 0.46 volt to 2.44 volts range (KOER) indicates a hard fault..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1109, P1112, P1114, P1115 - Intake Air Temperature & Possible Causes
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1116 & P1117 - Engine Coolant Temperature & Possible Causes
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1120, P1121, P1124, P1125 - Throttle Position Sensor & Possible Causes
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1127, P1128, P1129, P1130, P1131, P1132, P1137, P1138, P1150, P1151, P1152, P1157, P1157, Oxygen Sensors & Possible Causes
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1131, P1132, P1137, P1138, P1151, P1157, P1152, P1158, P1401, P1405, P1406, P1443, P1506 & P1507, P1537, P1538 & Possible Causes
Source: by tradervar.com
DTC P1150 Lack of HO2S-21 Switch, Same as DTC P1130, but opposite See Possible Causes for DTC P1130; Possible Causes; Common is a bad O2 Sensor; •Short to VPWR or VREF in harness or HO2S •HO2S circuit shorted to Ground •Water in harness connector •Open circuit •Corrosion or poor mating terminals and wiring •Damaged HO2S •Damaged PCM (other DTCs should be present); Fuel System: •Excessive fuel pressure (stuck fuel pressure regulator, restricted fuel return lines, etc.) •Leaking/contaminated fuel injectors or fuel pressure regulator •Low fuel pressure or running out of fuel (fuel pump concern, fuel supply line restrictions, low fuel level, etc.) •Vapor recovery system (stuck VMV, etc.); Induction System: •MAF contamination •Air leaks between MAF and throttle plate •PCV system; Other vacuum leaks •Improperly seated engine oil dipstick; EGR System; •Leaking gasket •Stuck EGR valve / Leaking diaphragm or EVR; Base Engine: •Oil overfill •Incorrect cylinder compression •Exhaust leaks before or near the HO2S •Secondary air stuck on. Read More
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
DTC P1351 Ignition Diagnostic Monitor Circuit Input Fault "...P1351 can occur if the Igniton Module was replaced with the Gray one instead of a Black one. The ICM Should be Black in color for the CCD Type Module. Many Ford parts sources are incorrect and show that this vehicle should have a Grey module. The Motorcraft part number for the BLACK CCD Ignition Modules is a DY1077 (supercedes DY679, DY667, DY645)..."
Source: by miesk at FSB
DTC P1359 Spark output circuit condition; ECM detected no SPOUT signal from distributor. Probable Cause: SPOUT connector missing; Open circuit condition; Ignition control module fault. 1. Check the Spark Output (SPOUT) connector near the Ignition Control Module (ICM) at the rear of driver side fender apron (near hood hinge) to see if the SPOUT connector is missing or is making poor contact to the connector. 2. If the SPOUT connector & connection appear to be in good condition, install a timing light onto #1 spark plug wire and check for timing advance at idle with the engine running. Ignition timing should indicate 10 degrees BTDC with the SPOUT connector removed but timing should then advance when the connector is plugged back in. 3. If there is no timing advance using a timing light, check the Pink (PK) wire at the ICM connection for a square-wave signal as the engine is running using a labscope. 4. If there is no signal present on the PK wire, check the PK wire between the ICM and PCM pin 50 for an open circuit. 5. If the circuit checks to be OK and ignition timing appears to be advancing over base timing with the SPOUT connector installed, clear the code, disconnect the voltage regulator at the alternator and drive the vehicle for several miles to check for the light to illuminate and the code to reset. 6. Check coil output of all individual spark plug wire ends to verify that spark will jump a 1/2-3/4" gap consistently and that it has a bluish tint of color to it. 7. If spark output is weak or erratic, replace the coil and re-check for the setting of the service code. 8. Also inspect all plug wires ends for potential pin-hole leaks that could allow spark to arc to the cylinder heads in the plug well. Run a grounded screw driver up and down the plug wire boot as the wire is connected to a spark tester to determine if any of the wires are faulty. 9. If timing advance appears to be working properly and there are no electrical issues related to the alternator, coil or plug wires, either the PCM or the ICM will need to be substituted to determine if one of them is causing the condition. See diagram by Ford via Steve83 @ http://www.supermotors.net/registry/media/833750_1 1996 is CCD H. read more
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
DTC P1405 - DPF EGR Sensor Upstream Hose Off or Plugged; "... While driving, the EGR monitor commands the EGR valve closed and checks the differential pressure across the EGR orifice. The test fails when the signal from the DPF EGR sensor indicates EGR flow is in the negative direction. Upstream hose is disconnected Upstream hose is plugged (ice) Plugged or damaged EGR tube Look for signs of water or icing in hose Verify hose connection and routing (no excessive dips) Verify DPF EGR sensor proper mounting and function (view DPF EGR PID while applying and releasing vacuum directly to sensor with a hand pump)..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1405 DPF-EGR Sensor Upstream Hose Off or Plugged; "...These codes are set by the engine computer detecting a vacuum leak or vacuum hose being plugged on the Differential Pressure Flow Exhaust Gas Recirculation (DPF-EGR) sensor. The upstream and downstream hoses are located on the intake manifold. Use a vacuum pump to test the line for a blockage or leak..."
Source: by tradervar.com
DTC P1406 - DPF EGR Sensor Downstream Hose Off or Plugged; "...While driving, the EGR monitor commands the EGR valve closed and checks the differential pressure across the EGR orifice. The test fails when the signal from the DPF EGR sensor continues to indicate EGR flow even after the EGR valve is commanded closed. Downstream hose is disconnected Downstream hose is plugged (ice) Plugged or damaged EGR tube Look for signs of water or icing in hose Verify connection and routing (no excessive dips) Verify DPF EGR sensor proper mounting and function (view DPFEGR PID while applying and releasing vacuum directly to sensor with a hand pump)..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1406 DPF-EGR Sensor Upstream Hose Off or Plugged; "...These codes are set by the engine computer detecting a vacuum leak or vacuum hose being plugged on the Differential Pressure Flow Exhaust Gas Recirculation (DPF-EGR) sensor. The upstream and downstream hoses are located on the intake manifold. Use a vacuum pump to test the line for a blockage or leak..."
Source: by tradervar.com
DTC P1408 - EGR Flow Out of Self-Test Range; "... This test is performed during the KOER on demand self-test only. The EGR system is commanded ON at a fixed engine speed. The test fails and the DTC is output when the measured EGR flow falls below the required calibrated minimum. See Possible Causes for DTC P0401..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1409 - EGR Vacuum Regulator Solenoid Circuit Malfunction; "... This test checks the electrical function of the EGRVR solenoid. The test fails when the EGRVR circuit voltage is either too high or too low when compared to the expected voltage range. The EGR system must be enabled for the test to be completed. EGRVR circuit open VPWR open to EGRVR solenoid EGRVR circuit short to VPWR or GND Damaged EGRVR solenoid Damaged PCM The EGR vacuum regulator solenoid resistance is from 26 to 40 ohms..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1411, P1413, P1414 - Secondary Air Injection (AIR) & Possible Causes
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1443 EVAP Vacuum System, Purge or VMV Fault
Source: by tradervar.com
DTC P1500 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Intermittent; "... Indicates the VSS input signal was intermittent. This DTC is set when a VSS fault interferes with other OBDII tests, such as Catalyst efficiency monitor, EVAP monitor, HO2S monitor, etc. Intermittent VSS connections Intermittent open in VSS harness circuit(s) Intermittent short in VSS harness circuit(s) Damaged VSS Damaged PCM..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1501, P1502 - Vehicle Speed Sensor & Possible Causes
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1504, P1506, P1507- Idle Air Control (IAC) & Possible Causes
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1506 & P1507 Idle Air Control Overspeed Error & Overspeed Error; "...A vacuum leak, a damaged IAC assembly, a stuck IAC valve or throttle valve typically sets one or both of these codes. The IAC can be checked with a scan tool, sensor tester or multimeter. A vacuum leak is one of the most common causes and can be checked with a vacuum pump..."
Source: by tradervar.com
DTC P1550 - Power Steering Pressure (PSP) Sensor Malfunction; "... The PSP sensor input signal to PCM is continuously monitored. The test fails when the signal falls out of a maximum or minimum calibrated range..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1605 - Keep Alive Memory Test Failure; "... Indicates the PCM has experienced an internal memory test failure. However there are external items that can cause this DTC. Battery terminal corrosion Damaged PCM KAPWR to PCM interrupt/open Loose battery connection If KAPWR is interrupted to the PCM, because of a battery or PCM disconnect, DTC can be generated on the first power-up..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1633 - Keep Alive Power Voltage Too Low; "... Indicates that the Keep Alive Power (KAPWR) circuit has experienced a power interrupt. Open KAPWR circuit. Damaged PCM. Intermittent KAPWR Circuit.."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1650, P1651 - Power Steering Pressure (PSP) Switch & Possible Causes
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1703 - Brake Switch Out of Self-Test Range Indicates that during Key On Engine Off (KOEO) Self-Test, BPP signal was high. Or during Key On Engine Running (KOER) Self -Test, the BPP signal did not cycle high and low. Open or short in (BPP) circuit Open or short in stoplamp circuits Damaged PCM Malfunction in module(s) connected to BPP circuit (Rear Electronic Module [REM] Windstar and LS6/LS8 and Lighting Control Module (LCM), Damaged Brake Switch, Misadjusted Brake Switch. Check for proper function of stoplamps. Follow correct Self-Test procedures, refer to Section 2, Quick Test..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1709 - Park/Neutral Position Switch Out of Self-Test Range; "... The DTCs indicate that the voltage is high when it should be low..." read more; Miesk5 Note, also, 1.Failed PNP/CPP switch 2.Open or short circuit condition
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1729 - 4x4L Switch Malfunction; "... The 4x4L switch is an ON/OFF. If the PCM does not see low voltage when the switch is ON a DTC will set. 4x4L harness open or shorted..." read more
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1742 TSB 96-5-16 for 96 Bronco, E & F Series; Application Chart; "...The Check Engine lamp may illuminate and a Code P1742 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present. This may be caused by an improper signaling within the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). ACTION: Reprogram or replace the PCM. Refer to the following Service Procedure for details..."
Source: by Ford via Chilton
DTC P1742 TSB 96-6-9 for 96 Bronco & F Series; "...The Check Engine lamp may illuminate and a Code P1742 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present. This may be caused by an improper signaling within the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). ACTION: Reprogram or replace the PCM. Refer to the following Service Procedure for details..."
Source: by Ford via diesel-central.com via miesk5 at FSB
DTC P1742 TSB 96-6-9 for 96 Bronco & F Series; Application Chart; "...The Check Engine lamp may illuminate and a Code P1742 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present. This may be caused by an improper signaling within the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). ACTION: Reprogram or replace the PCM. Refer to the following Service Procedure for details..." also, 1.Failed TCC solenoid 2.Short circuit condition 3.Mechnical fault within transmission
Source: by Ford via diesel-central.com via miesk5 at broncolinks.com
DTC P1780 - Transmission Control Switch Out of Self-Test Range; "... During KOER self-test the TCS has to be cycled, if not cycled a DTC is set. TCS circuit short or open. Damaged TCS switch. Damaged PCM. Verify the TCS switch cycles ON/OFF ..." read more
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1781 - 4x4L Switch Out of Self-Test Range The 4x4L switch is an ON/OFF. If the PCM does not see low voltage when the switch is on a DTC will..." read more
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC PO141 Troubleshooting in a 96; Bank 1, Sensor 2 (passenger side between cats (or behind the second one in a California vehicle); miesk5 Note, also, During testing the oxygen sensor (HO2S) heaters are checked for open and short circuits and exessive current draw Probable Cause[s] 1.Open or short circuit condition 2.Poor electrical connection 3.Low battery voltage /corrosion or incorrect harness connection 4.Damaged HO2S heater
Source: by HardMaple at Ford Bronco Zone Forums
DTC PO30_ "misfire detection monitor, a software strategy built into the computer, is designed to detect an engine misfire. The computer can also normally identify the specific cylinder in which the misfire has occurred. A misfire is nothing more than a lack of combustion, which can be caused by poor fuel quality or metering, low compression, lack of spark or unmetered air entering the engine. There are other possible, less obvious causes as well, such as uncommanded Exhaust Gas Recirculatin (EGR), flow. When the misfire monitor detects a misfire, it will trigger the check engine light with the specific cylinder number as the last digit in the P030X code. For instance cylinder 1 misfire is P0301, cylinder 2 is P0302 etc. In this case we are left with a P0306 in the computer memory; Possible Causes: Fuel injectors, related wiring, sensors and computer issues Running out of gas, or poor fuel quality Evaporative emissions system (EVAP) concerns: fuel vapors leaking into engine Incorrect Fuel Pressure EGR system concerns: leaking EGR valve or restricted ports Base engine concerns: low compression, valve train problems and timing issues Ignition system concerns including, but not limited to: Faulty spark plugs Faulty coil or related wiring Ignition module or related wiring issues Ignition related sensor faults or wiring issues..."
Source: by engine-light-help.com
DTC PO401; Most of da time, because of hot exh gases flowing thru a little device, it is a failed DPFE sensor; Before you buy a new one; ck the two high temperature silicone hoses that go from da EGT Tube's 2 small diameter tubes to the DPFE sensor. They are available at your local Ford Dealer. The dealer sells this special silicone hose by the foot ( I paid $10.00 for each hose & you trim it to exact length. PNs 1L3Z-9P761-AA - 1/4" for REF - Downstream hose (INTAKE) & 1L3Z-9P761-BA - 5/16" for Upstream hose (EXHAUST); For da DPFE Sensor, The new DPFE sensor will be plastic as your original is still probably die cast metal; dealers in area want $150.00 for the DPFE Sensor and will not discount; so I bought the MOTORCRAFT DPFE15 thru Amazon w/free S&H for $60.00 and no tax; Also read the DPFE TEST @ http://www.tomco-inc.com/Tech_Tips/ttt36.pdf
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
DTC Test, FREE - AutoZone Diagnostic Service
Source: by autozone.com
DTC Test, FREE - For a coupon for a free AAMCO External Diagnostic Service
Source: by AAMCO
DTC, OBD II, Oxygen Sensor Related & Possible Causes TSB 01-9-7 for 96
Source: by Ford via v8sho.com
DTCs
Source: by screwy at clubfte.com
DTCs
Source: by autodiagnos.com
DTCs
Source: by bba-reman.com
DTCs & Possible Causes
Source: by tradervar.com
DTCs & Possible Causes
Source: by zx3 focus racer at Focaljet
DTCs & Possible Causes
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
DTCs & Possible Causes - MANY
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTCs & Possible Causes - MANY
Source: by Focus Fanatics
DTCs & Possible Causes, MANY!
Source: by diydiagnostics.com via web.archive.org
DTCs & Possible Causes; P0102 - Mass Air Flow (MAF) Circuit Low Input, P0103 - Mass Air Flow (MAF) Circuit High Input, P0106 - Barometric (BARO) Pressure Sensor Circuit Performance, P0107 - BARO Sensor Low Voltage Detected, P0108 - BARO Sensor High Voltage Detected, P0109 - BARO Sensor Circuit Intermittent, P0112 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Circuit Low Input, P0113 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Circuit High Input, P0117 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Circuit Low Input, P0118 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Circuit High Input, P0121 - Throttle Position (TP) Circuit Performance Problem, P0122 - Throttle Position (TP) Circuit Low Input, P0123 - Throttle Position (TP) Circuit High Input, P0125 - Insufficient Coolant Temperature For Closed Loop Fuel Control, P0127 - Intake Air Temperature Too High, P0131 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Out of Range Low Voltage (HO2S-11), P0133 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Slow Response (HO2S-11), P0135 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-11), P0136 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-12), P0141 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-125), P0151 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Out of Range Low Voltage (HO2S-21), P0153 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Slow Response (HO2S-21), P0155 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-21), P0156 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-22), P0161 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-22), P0171 - System to Lean (Bank 1), P0172 - System to Rich (Bank 1), P0174 - System to Lean (Bank 2), P0175 - System to Rich (Bank 2), P0180 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit Low Input (EFT), P0181 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit Range/ Performance (EFT), P0182 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit Low Input (EFT), P0183 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit High Input (EFT), P0186 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance (EFT), P0187 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit Low Input (EFT), P0188 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit High Input (EFT, P0190 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Malfunction (FRP), P0191 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Performance (FRP), P0192 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Low Input (FRP), P0193 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input (FRP), P0217 - Engine Coolant Over-Temperature Condition, P0230 - Fuel Pump Primary Circuit Malfunction, P0231 - Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit Low, P0232 - Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit High, P0300 - Random Misfire, P0301 through P0310 - Misfire Detection Monitor, P0320 - Ignition Engine Speed Input Circuit Malfunction, P0325 - Knock Sensor 1 Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1), P0326 - Knock Sensor 1 Circuit Range/ Performance (Bank 1), P0331 - Knock Sensor 2 Circuit Range/performance (Bank 2), P0340 - Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor Circuit Malfunction, P0350 - Ignition Coil (Undetermined) Primary/ Secondary Circuit Malfunction, P0401 - EGR Flow Insufficient Detected, P0402 - EGR Flow Excessive Detected, P0411 - Secondary Air Injection (AIR) system upstream flow, P0412 - Secondary Air Injection System (AIR) circuit malfunction, P0420 - Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 1), P0430 - Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 2), P0442 - EVAP Control System Leak Detected (Small Leak), P0443 - EVAP Control System Canister Purge Valve Circuit Malfunction, P0455 - EVAP Control System Leak Detected (No Purge Flow or Large Leak), P0456 - EVAP Control System Leak Detected (Very Small Leak), P0457 - EVAP Control System Leak Detected (Fuel Filler Cap Loose/Off), P0500 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Malfunction, P0501 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Range/ Performance, P0503 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Intermittent, P0503 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Intermittent, P0505 - Idle Air Control System Malfunction, P0703 - Brake Switch Circuit Input Malfunction, P1112 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Sensor Intermittent, P1116 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Out of Self-Test Range, P1117 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Intermittent, P1130 - Lack of HO2S-11 Switch, Fuel Trim at Limit, P1131 - Lack of HO2S-11 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean, P1132 - Lack of HO2S-11 Switch, Sensor Indicates Rich, P1137 - Lack of HO2S-12 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean, P1138 - Lack of HO2S-12 Switch, Sensor Indicates Rich, P1150 - Lack of HO2S-21 Switch, Fuel Trim at Limit, P1151 - Lack of HO2S-21 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean, P1152 - Lack of HO2S-21 Switch, Sensor Indicates Rich, P1157 - Lack of HO2S-22 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean, P1158 - Lack of HO2S-22 Switch, Sensor Indicates Rich, P1400 - DPF EGR Sensor Circuit Low Voltage Detected, P1401 - DPF EGR Sensor Circuit High Voltage Detected, P1405 - DPF EGR Sensor Upstream Hose Off or Plugged, P1406 - DPF EGR Sensor Downstream Hose Off or Plugged, P1408 - EGR Flow Out of Self-Test Range, P1409 - EGR Vacuum Regulator Solenoid Circuit Malfunction, P1411 - Secondary Air Injection (AIR) system downstream flow, P1500 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Intermittent, P1501 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Out of Self Test Range, P1504 - Idle Air Control (IAC) Circuit Malfunction, P1506 - Idle Air Control (IAC) Overspeed Error
Source: by Ford via p71interceptor.com
DTCs & Possible Causes; P1130 - Lack of HO2S-11 Switch, Fuel Trim at Limit, P0102 - Mass Air Flow (MAF) Circuit Low Input, P0103 - Mass Air Flow (MAF) Circuit High Input, P0106 - Barometric (BARO) Pressure Sensor Circuit Performnce, P0107 - BARO Sensor Low Voltage Detected, P0108 - BARO Sensor High Voltage Detected, P0109 - BARO Sensor Circuit Intermittent, P0112 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Circuit Low Input, P0113 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Circuit High Input, P0117 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Circuit Low Input, P0118 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Circuit High Input, P0121 - Throttle Position (TP) Circuit Performance Problem, P0122 - Throttle Position (TP) Circuit Low Input, P0123 - Throttle Position (TP) Circuit High Input, P0125 - Insufficient Coolant Temperature For Closed Loop Fuel Control, P0127 - Intake Air Temperature Too High, P0131 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Out of Range Low Voltage (HO2S-11), P0133 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Slow Response (HO2S-11), P0135 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-11), P0136 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-12), P0141 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-125), P0151 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Out of Range Low Voltage (HO2S-21) See DTC P0131, P0153 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Slow Response (HO2S-21) See DTC P0133, P0155 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-21) See DTC P0135 P0156 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-22) See DTC P0136, P0161 - HO2S Sensor Circuit Malfunction (HO2S-22) See DTC P0135, P0171 - System to Lean (Bank 1) The Adaptive Fuel Strategy continuously monitors fuel delivery hardware. The test fails when the adaptive fuel tables reach a rich calibrated limit., P0172 - System to Rich (Bank 1), P0174 - System to Lean (Bank 2), P0175 - System to Rich (Bank 2), P0176 - Flexible Fuel (FF) Sensor Circuit Malfunction, P0180 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit Low Input (EFT), P0181 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit Range/ Performance (EFT), P0182 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit Low Input (EFT), P0183 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor A Circuit High Input (EFT). P0186 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit Range/Performance (EFT) See DTC P0181. P0187 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit Low Input (EFT). See DTC P0182. P0188 - Engine Fuel Temperature Sensor B Circuit High Input (EFT) See DTC P0183, P0190 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Malfunction (FRP), P0191 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Performance (FRP), P0192 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit Low Input (FRP), P0193 - Fuel Rail Pressure Sensor Circuit High Input (FRP), P0201 through P0212 - Cylinder #1 through Cylinder #12 Injector Circuits, P0217 - Engine Coolant Over-Temperature Condition, P0230 - Fuel Pump Primary Circuit Malfunction, P0231 - Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit Low, P0232 - Fuel Pump Secondary Circuit High, P0234 - Supercharger Overboost Condition, P0243 - Supercharger (Boost) Bypass Solenoid Circuit Malfunction, P0298 - Engine Oil Over Temperature Condition, P0300 - Random Misfire, P0301 through P0310 - Misfire Detection Monitor, P0320 - Ignition Engine Speed Input Circuit Malfunction, P0325 - Knock Sensor 1 Circuit Malfunction (Bank 1), P0326 - Knock Sensor 1 Circuit Range/ Performance (Bank 1), P0330 - Knock Sensor 2 Circuit Malfunction (Bank 2), P0331 - Knock Sensor 2 Circuit Range/performance (Bank 2), P0340 - Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor Circuit Malfunction, P0350 - Ignition Coil (Undetermined) Primary/ Secondary Circuit Malfunction, P0351 Through P0360 - Ignition Coil A through J Primary/ Secondary Circuit Malfunction, P0401 - EGR Flow Insufficient Detected, P0402 - EGR Flow Excessive Detected, P0411 - Secondary Air Injection (AIR) system upstream flow See DTC P1411, P0412 - Secondary Air Injection System (AIR) circuit malfunction, P0420 - Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 1), P0430 - Catalyst System Efficiency Below Threshold (Bank 2), P0442 - EVAP Control System Leak Detected (Small Leak), P0443 - EVAP Control System Canister Purge Valve Circuit Malfunction, P0451 - FTP Sensor Circuit Noisy, P0452 - FTP Sensor Circuit Low Voltage Detected, P0453 - FTP Sensor Circuit High Voltage Detected, P0455 - EVAP Control System Leak Detected (No Purge Flow or Large Leak), P0456 - EVAP Control System Leak Detected (Very Small Leak), P0457 - EVAP Control System Leak Detected (Fuel Filler Cap Loose/Off), P0460 - Fuel Level Sensor Circuit Malfunction, P0500 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Malfunction, P0501 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Range/ Performance, P0503 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Intermittent, P0503 - Vehicle Speed Sensor (VSS) Intermittent, P0505 - Idle Air Control System Malfunction, P0552 - Power Steering Pressure (PSP) Sensor Circuit Malfunction, P0553 - Power Steering Pressure (PSP) Sensor Circuit Malfunction, P0602 - Control Module Programming Error, P0603 - Powertrain Control Module KAM Test Error, P0605 - PCM Read Only Memory (ROM) error, P0703 - Brake Switch Circuit Input Malfunction, P0704 - Clutch Pedal Position Switch Malfunction, P0720 - Insufficient input from Output Shaft Speed sensor, P0721 - Noise interference on Output Shaft Speed sensor signal, P0722 - No signal from Output Shaft Speed sensor, P0723 - Output Shaft Speed sensor circuit intermittent failure, P0812 - Reverse Switch (RS) input circuit malfunction, P1000 - Monitor Testing Not Complete, P1001 - KOER Not Able To Complete, KOER Aborted, P1100 - Mass Air Flow (MAF) Sensor Intermittent, P1101 - Mass Air Flow (MAF) Sensor Out of Self-Test Range, P1109 - Intake Air Temperature 2 Sensor Intermittent, P1112 - Intake Air Temperature (IAT) Sensor Intermittent, P1114 - Intake Air Temperature 2 Circuit Low Input, P1115 - Intake Air Temperature 2 Circuit High Input, P1116 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Out of Self-Test Range, P1117 - Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Intermittent, P1120 - Throttle Position (TP) Sensor Out of Range Low (RATCH too Low), P1121 - Throttle Position (TP) Sensor Inconsistent with MAF Sensor, P1124 - Throttle Position (TP) Sensor Out of Self-Test Range, P1125 - Throttle Position (TP) Sensor Intermittent, P1127 - Exhaust Not Warm Enough, Downstream Sensor Not Tested, P1128 - Upstream Oxygen Sensors Swapped from Bank to Bank (HO2S-11-21), P1129 - Downstream Oxygen Sensors Swapped from Bank to Bank (HO2S-12-22), P1130 - Lack of HO2S-11 Switch, Fuel Trim at Limit, P1131 - Lack of HO2S-11 Switch, Sensor Indicates Lean. READ MORE
Source: by Steve at justanswer.com
DTCs 3 digits & OBD II & Possible Causes & Repair Procedures for E4OD from 1996 All F-Series and Bronco with E4OD Automatic Transmission Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
DTCs for 01-03 Gas & Diesel
Source: by screwy at clubfte.com
DTCs, Ford (PARTIAL LIST)
Source: by obd-codes.com
DTCs, OBD II Body 'B'
Source: by bba-reman.com
DTCs, Search
Source: by Wells
E4OD Controls Overview, Sensors, DTC (s) & Diagram; Powertrain Control Module (PCM) 12A650: On vehicles equipped with gasoline engines, the operation of the E4OD automatic transmission is controlled by the powertrain control module. Many input sensors provide information to the powertrain control module, which then controls the actuators that affect transmission operation..." READ MUCH MORE
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
E4OD Diagnosis Trouble Codes (DTCs)
Source: by drivetrain.com
E4OD Diagnostic Trouble Codes, Possible Causes & Repair Procedures
Source: by Pat B & Level Ten Products at FTE
E4OD Limp Mode; "...If all the shifts are hard, the computer is going into limp mode which causes the trans to shift hard because the pressures are increased.The computer goes into limp mode when it senses an error in the transmission shifting or electrical system.The most common cause for this is the transmission range sensor.This is the sensor that is bolted to the drivers side of the transmission case with the shift lever arm going through the center of the sensor.Try disconnecting the battery for 15 minutes with the headlamps on.This should clear the limp mode and return the transmission to normal shift strategy. If it does then the problem is intermittent.If it still shifts hard then the fault is continuously occurring.It is possible that there is another input/output signal problem, but 99% of the time it is the range sensor especially if it clears limp mode proving the problem is intermittent..."
Source: by Kenny Z at justanswer.com
E4OD Wrong Gear Starts, TCC hunting, No 4th gear, Engine Stalling, High or Erratic Line Pressure or a Neutral Condition & Seldom Stores a DTC 67 or 634; "...One of the most-difficult problems to diagnose on a Ford car or truck is a sudden neutral condition while the vehicle is cruising in 4th gear. Now this can have a number of causes, depending on which transmission is in the car or truck, but the cause we are going to discuss here is that #(~! *&A% Manual Lever Position Sensor – that’s right, the old MLPS. This sensor is responsible for more malfunctions than any other sensor in the system, and the kicker is that it seldom stores a code 67 or 634. Actually there is a standing joke in our industry that says, “You got a problem with a Ford, change the MLPS; it fixes everything,” which ain’t that funny because it’s not that far from the truth. Some of the problems the MLPS can cause are wrong gear starts, TCC hunting, no 4th gear, engine stalling, high or erratic line pressure and the problem that this article is about – a sudden neutral condition. Whether the MLPS is attached to an E4OD, AXODE, AODE or CD4E, the operating characteristics are the same. What that means is the MLPS is classified as a step-down resistor. The MLPS is supplied 5 volts from the computer as a reference voltage, and as the shift lever is moved from park toward manual low, the voltage in each gear-shift position will decrease as shown in Figure 1. The MLPS also can be checked for correct resistance, also shown in Figure 1. This way, if the resistance checked good on the bench but the voltage does not check good in the vehicle, you know there must be a wiring or ground problem. I know what you are thinking: You replace the MLPS on every job you do, so why should you check the resistance on a new part? Well, that’s fine, but one thing has become very clear lately: NEW DOES NOT MEAN GOOD! Now, let’s get to the meat of the problem. As you can see in Figure 1, the voltage in the drive/overdrive position can be 1.88 to 2.30 volts. The O.D. Cancel button, on those vehicles equipped with one, has no effect on the voltage seen in the drive position, nor does it matter whether the vehicle has a gas or diesel engine. This would be the voltage seen in the D or D position if it were available on the scan-tool screen in the data mode. Unfortunately, this information is not always available, and this “glitch” may occur faster than the scan-tool’s update capability so the voltage jump would be missed. Therefore, a digital multimeter must be used to monitor this voltage. This is of the utmost importance in diagnosing the sudden-neutral condition. This voltage should be monitored when the neutral condition occurs by placing the multimeter’s positive lead to computer terminal 30 if it is an EEC-IV system, as illustrated in Figure 2, or to terminal 64 if it is an EEC-V system. This wire is light blue/yellow on all applications except vehicles with the CD4E. On these the signal wire is red/black. Now, here is where this gets a little involved. The negative lead of the multimeter should be placed at the MLPS signal-return ground terminal at the MLPS. The reason is that the ground circuit for the MLPS can be shared by as many as FIVE other sensors, as seen in the wiring diagram in Figure 2. This means that there are factory splices in this ground circuit. If you check this ground at computer terminal 46 for the EEC- IV or computer terminal 91 for the EEC-V, the ground may check good but could be bad at the MLPS if there is a problem on the MLPS side of the splice, as also can be seen in the wiring diagram in Figure 2. The ground-circuit wire for 1989-90 F- and E-series trucks is black/white; all other vehicles use a gray/red ground wire except for CD4E applications, on which the ground wire is black/blue. Once the multimeter is connected to these circuits, as seen in Figure 3, place the meter where it can be seen while driving. When the transmission suddenly neutrals, be sure to have someone observe the multimeter, or use the meter’s MIN/MAX feature to record the highest and lowest voltage readings that occurred in the circuit. If the voltage jumps toward 3 volts as shown in Figure 3, and at that very moment the transmission neutrals, either the MLPS is faulty or the MLPS ground circuit is poor. Under normal conditions, this voltage reading SHOULD NOT CHANGE! When the voltage jumps toward 3 volts, this indicates a neutral-shift- lever position to the processor. This confuses the computer’s logic system, and therefore the computer is unable to fire the shift solenoids correctly (I think), and – BAM – you have a sudden-neutral condition. Why does the voltage jump because of a poor ground? The poorer the ground, the higher the resistance will be in that ground circuit. The higher resistance will cause the voltage in the overdrive or drive position to rise toward the 5-volt reference voltage, much like putting a bend in a garden hose would raise the pressure in the hose behind the bend. Ground- circuit integrity can be verified by placing the positive multimeter lead to the MLPS ground terminal at the MLPS and the negative multimeter lead to the negative battery post, as seen in Figure 4. With the multimeter set to DC volts and the engine running, the maximum voltage should be 0.1 volt. If more than 0.1 volt is seen on this ground circuit, it is NOT a good ground. In order to correct this condition, cut the ground wire close to the MLPS, attach it to a known good ground and recheck as previously described. Two things must be remembered here. One is that the return electricity will seek the path of least resistance. This path MUST be the ground circuit, NOT your multimeter. That’s why you should see a maximum of 0.1 volt on any 5-volt-reference ground circuit; 0.3 is acceptable on a 12-volt-reference voltage supply. The second thing to remember is that most electrical- fault phone calls I receive on the ATSG helpline are ground-related problems, so be sure to use the voltage-drop method of checking grounds as described. It may help to prevent you from falling into this trap..." See Diagrams & instructions
Source: by Pete L at transonline.com
EEC Relay Location in Power Distribution Box Diagram in a 96 Bronco & F-Series
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Electronic Engine Control (EEC) Overview, Ford
Source: by bullittarchive.com
Emission Testing
Source: by Alexis G via autoiInc.online
Engine Compartment Relay Mounting Bracket Fabrication
Source: by Seattle FSB (SeattleFSB) at FSB
Engine Compartment Relay Mounting Bracket Fabrication pics
Source: by SeattleFSB (Seattle FSB) at SuperMotors.net
Engine Management System Links, Ford
Source: by acc-electronics.com via web.archive.org
Forum
Source: by obdii.com
Freeze Frame Data & No Codes; Another advantage of OBD II is the freeze frame data function of the scan tool. Whenever an emissions related DTC is set, the MIL will illuminate and a freeze frame will be set in the PCM’s memory. The freeze frame should contain, but isn’t limited to, the following data: Engine load (calculated) , Engine RPM , Short- and long-term fuel trim, Vehicle speed, Coolant temperature, Intake manifold pressure, Open/closed loop operation, Fuel pressure (if available), DTC; In this generic scan tool feature, you can’t get DTCs. But you can get a serial data stream that will update a minimum of two times a second. More importantly, you will have access to at least 16 data parameters and a 66-frame movie of ECU/PCM data. The most important function of any scan tool is to diagnose intermittent problems. Listed below are my reasons why the movie/snap-shot is so valuable! On slower baud rate systems, [b]an out-of-range sensor may take several frames of data before a DTC is set. But it would still cause a noticeable driveability problem on the vehicle. And it still might not set a DTC. Duplicating the customer’s complaint with a road test and a movie/ snap-shot may be the only way to properly diagnose the vehicle..." READ MORE
Source: by Gary G at asashop.org
Fuel Trim; "...Fuel trim refers to adjustments being made dynamically to the base fuel table to get the proper ratio of fuel to air. Short term fuel trim refers to adjustments being made in response to temporary conditions. Long term fuel trim is used to compensate for issues that seem to be present over a much longer period. Fuel trims are expressed in percentages; positive values indicate lean (add fuel) and negative values indicate rich (subtract fuel). Fuel trim banks refer to the cylinder banks in a V style engine. Cylinder #1 is always in bank 1. Fuel trim is generally calculated by using a wide set of data values, including front O2 sensors, intake air temperature/pressure (or the more elegent air mass sensor), engine (coolant) temp, anti-knock sensors, engine load, throttle position (and change in throttle position), and even battery voltage can effect fuel trim. Long term fuel trim generally should not exceed +- 10%. Generally, and for OBD II,The HO2S detects the presence of oxygen in the exhaust and provides the PCM with feedback indicating a rich or lean condition. A correction factor is added to the fuel injector pulsewidth calculation according to the Long and Short Term Fuel Trims as needed to compensate for variations in the fuel system..."
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
Generic Communication Protocols
Source: by Manufacturer by etools.org
High Idle & Dieseling Troubleshooting Chart in a 94, from PCED Chart 7 for a 94; Preliminary Checks; Overheating or not Reaching Normal Operating Temperature, Vacuum Leaks, Throttle Plate & Linkage, Speed Control Chain Binding/Sticking, Air Intake Tube/ Intake Manifold Leaks; Check for Codes..." READ MORE
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
J1850 Bus Positive/Data Positive & Negative/Data Negative (Return): MIESK5 NOTE, I think this is from/to Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) (Test Connector) and then to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Limp Mode; "...Fail Code conditions or Limp Mode happens when the vehicle computer recognizes a problem in it's logic. When an expected signal value from a sensor is sent to the computer and is not within the computer's programmed specifications, secondary programs are activated by the computer to strive to protect the transmission from damage the improper sensor signal might cause to occur. In other words, the computer is always expecting certain signal values from certain sensors i.e. the temperature sensor, the speed sensor, the throttle position sensor, etc. As long as these signals are what it would normally expect for the conditions and is normal based on all the other signals it is receiving from other sensors, it acts normally and accordingly. If the computer, all of a sudden, receives some crazy signal from one of the sensors that is out of the normal range expected from this sensor, it will go to emergency or secondary measures. These emergency measures vary depending on the severity of the defective signal. All this is preprogrammed into the computer's logic by the manufacturer. The manufacturer has decided that as long as a certain parameter of a particular signal is sent from a sensor to the computer, all is well. The manufacturer decided that if this signal is higher than their highest parameter or lower than their lowest parameter, something is wrong with that sensor and the computer should make someone aware of the situation and take action to try to save the vehicle systems or powertrain. Perhaps the computer will simply cause the check engine light to come on. The signal variation wasn't severe or critical to cause any mechanical failures but the vehicle's operator is made aware that he or she should have the vehicle checked out electronically to see if a minor sensor has broken down or is starting to send the odd irratic signal. This type of condition is commonly referred to as a soft code. Normal functions are not affected but if the repair is not made, performance or fuel efficiencies might suffer. Perhaps the sensor only malfunctioned one time and all other times was fine. This might be an early warning of a sensor that is beginning to fail or has a loose connector or connection. Other times the signal needed to perform operations normally is so far out of specification that the computer has no choice but to go into survival mode. With transmissions, the computer will cause the internal tranny fluid line pressure to default to high to protect clutches and bands. The transmission also turns off the shift solenoids to cause the unit to default to a single gear, usually second or third. All normal instructions to control line pressure are overridden so a hazardous slipping condition cannot occur easily. This theoretically is so that the vehicle's driver can get the damaged vehicle to the next town for repairs. This condition is commonly called Limp Mode for this reason. You limp to the next town in second or third gear only, at full line pressure so the tranny guts won't slip on your trip in. By the way, interestingly and just as a side note, if the cable harness going to your transmission was ever to become detached, severed or damaged, your transmission would also go to limp mode. The vehicle's computer would immediately sense that it has lost contact with the transmission and would set the codes and send limp mode signals to the tranny. But because the harness is severed between the computer and the transmission, no computer signals will reach the transmission. These sent signals, however, would have had the identical affect on the transmission as what taking away supplied power to the shift and line pressure solenoids has as in the case of a transmission harness being detached or cut. Due to the engineered voltage strategies of the solenoids, the transmission simply defaults to a single gear and line pressure defaults to high, all in order to limp you home. A Throttle Position Sensor that improperly sends a reading that it is wide open when in fact it is physically closed would be detected by the computer when it compared this reading with the vehicle speed sensor that perhaps is showing very slow vehicle speed. The signal, by itself can't be considered wrong but when put against all the other sensor signals of the system might cause a computer concern. The computer, at this point, unable to trust the collection of signals because together they are not making sense in it's logic, will simply go to limp mode in the transmission to protect it and make the operator aware that something is wrong with one of the sensors and a mechanic's attention is needed to correct the situation. This Fail Code Condition will show up as a code reading on a mechanic's scanner. This code will be cross referenced to a table from the manufacturer and represent a problem with a particular sensor or a group of sensors or system. It gives the mechanic a better idea of where the problem has showed up and which systems or sensors are involved in the malfunction. The table of codes and what each one means, is commonly programmed right into the scanner tool that the mechanic uses for easy reference. i.e. the scanner tool might tell the mechanic that the computer has thrown a code 35 which is the transmission fluid temperature sensor and might give the mechanic the recommended values this sensor should provide and what it in fact provided. In your electronic transmission, many important functions are controlled by the computer. Shift timing, sequence, feel, line pressure are controlled. The information from the vehicle speed sensor affects fuel injection, fuel mixture, ABS, transmission operation, etc. Load information of your engine is commonly taken primarily from the TPS (throttle position sensor) or the MAP sensor (manifold absolute pressure). This controls transmission shifting and downshifting when stepping on the gas or climbing hills. A regular scanning of the computer for any set hard or soft codes is something routinely done by most good tuneup shops these days..."
Source: by Greg O at autotransinc.com via webarchive.org
Limp Mode; "...The linkage to a throttle position sensor should use most of the rotating range of the throttle position sensor. This can be adjusted by changing the ratio of the linkage. Also, please make sure that a small amount of the sensor's travel is being used at idle. You will want a TPS voltage at idle of at least 0.35 volts. This is done to allow the TCS to detect problems with the TP sensor. For instance, if the sensor becomes disconnected or the linkage falls off, the TPS voltage will fall below the set idle threshold. If the TPS voltage goes below the idle threshold, the TCS assumes that the TPS is bad and will switch to failsafe line pressure and default shift points. This is done to prevent damage to the transmission from low line pressure and will provide a safe limp home mode..."
Source: by optishift.com
Limp Mode; "...The throttle position sensor signal takes the place of the throttle kickdown linkage on older mechanical automatics. So if the TPS is reading high or low, or has a dead spot, it can affect transmission kickdown shifts when accelerating, as well as normal upshifts and downshifts, too. If the TCM cannot get a good TPS signal, it may substitute a "calculated" throttle angle provided by the PCM over the data bus. Or, if this signal is not available, it may substitute a fixed value for the TPS signal. This will obviously affect the way it shifts (transmission typically hunts for shift points) but not necessarily cause it to go into a limp-in mode. A faulty throttle position sensor will not always set a fault code. The PCM has to be smart enough to figure out when the TPS is working properly and when it is not. Its diagnostic strategies may compare the TPS signal against engine rpm, MAP signal and/or airflow to determine if the TPS signal makes sense. If the TPS signal does not correspond to other sensor inputs that can be used to measure engine load, the PCM may set a fault code. Then again, it might not. It all depends on the self-diagnostic strategy, how sensitive it is to faults and how easily the PCM can detect problems. Under certain conditions, which may include the loss of one or more vital inputs to the TCM, the transmission will go into some kind of limp-in or defaul mode. When a serious fault is diagnosed (such as loss of an internal speed sensor signal) or a problem occurs in the wiring circuit to any of the shift solenoids, the TCM will kill the power to the transmission control relay and deenergize all of the shift solenoids. This usually causes the transmission to freeze in 2nd or 3rd gear. The transmission will remain in limp-in mode until (1) the problem is diagnosed and repaired, or (2) power to the TCM is momentarily turned off to reset the computer. This may restore normal operation temporarily, but as soon as the TCM detects the fault again, it will go back into limp-in mode..."
Source: by Larry C at aa1car.com
Links
Source: by obdii.com
Multi-Function Switch (MFS), Hazard & Brake Light MAY Disengage E4OD Torque Converter Lock-up Discussion in 92-96
Source: by members at nloc.net
Multi-Function Switch (MFS), Hazard & Brake Light MAY Disengage E4OD Torque Converter Lock-up; "...I was living with the torque converter unlocking with the R/H turn signal. And low and behold after I changed the L/H brake/turn signal bulb the torque converter stopped unlocking with the R/H turn signal. Don't ask me but it did fix it..."
Source: by Mike G & Miesk5 at Ford Bronco Zone Forums
No Start & Start, but when Starting Runs & No DTCs in a 96 "...As far as the signals in/out for spark and fuel between the EEC-IV/V they are basicly the same. Yes I know there is a makeshift crankshaft positioner for mis-fire detection, but that is probably not the issue here. I looked some info on one of my Service cds to compare the EEC-IV and EEC-V signals. Both use the PIP, SPOUT and IDM signals. According to the manual the PCM uses the PIP signal to trigger the injectors. So I would suspect a possible missing PIP signal. I am not /100%.jpg clear what the IDM signal does. I did have one other thought around midnight last night: Both systems will shut off the injectors if the TPS signal indicates full throttle when in the Start mode. What if the OPs TPS was shorted? This would send the +5V reference signal directly through to the feedback signal. Easy check: disconnect the TPS, then try to start. Next I would start verifying the PIP and possibly the IDM signals are getting back to the PCM..." MIESK5 NOTE; from Ford EVTM; The Control Module (PCM) runs the pump{s} for one second when it receives an ignition- on signal. It also runs the pumps as long as it receives a PIP signal from the Hall-effect devices, it continues pump operation even after the key is released from START. If the PIP signals fall below 120RPM, the control module cuts off the signal to the fuel pump relay or the integrated relay control module. The pump will also run when the terminals of the fuel pump test connector are jumped. the Control module signals the pump when it receives a CRANK signal, and when the Control module gets PIP signals that the engine is running. the pump does not run if the PIP indicates the engine is not running even with ignition ON {except for that first one second}.
Source: by rla2005 (Randy) at FSB
No Start and or Misfire, etc.; Thick Film Ignition (TFI) Testing, Overview & Diagrams, Distributor Mounted Ignition Control Module (ICM); "...Part I; In This Fast Test you'll be able to pinpoint the problem to the Ignition Control Module or the Ignition Coil or the Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor (PIP Sensor) in four easy test steps. This test will only help you in a Cranks but Does Not Start Condition. So then, before starting the tests, it's critical that you have checked and verified that there's NO SPARK present at the Ignition Coil. Why? Well, because if the Ignition Coil is sparking, it would be a clear indication that it and the Ignition Coil and the Crankshaft Position Sensor (PIP Sensor) are working. This article applies to both the Gray colored Ignition Control Module and the Black colored Ignition Control Module. The Gray colored Ignition Control Module is called the Push Start Module and the Black colored Ignition Control Module is called the Computer Controlled Dwell Module. These ignition control modules are not interchangeable. If you need the tests for the Ford Fender Mounted Ignition Control Module (ICM), click here. How Does the Ignition Control Module Work? Here's a little background information to help you diagnose this no spark condition. In a nutshell, when the system is working properly, at CRANK-UP and at all engine speeds, the Ignition Control Module controls the Ignition Coil. How? This is primarily done thru' the Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor Signal which is received by the Ignition Control Module (and also the ECM). The Ignition Control Module (ICM) upon receiving this signal, starts switching the Ignition Coil's Ground On and Off. As you may already know, it's this action that makes the Ignition Coil spark away. The Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor signal (more commonly called the PIP Signal) is critical for the Ignition Control Module to start sparking the Ignition Coil at START UP and at all engine speeds. The Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor is a Hall Effect type Crankshaft Position Sensor and produces a digital (On/Off) signal that can be seen with an LED or an oscilloscope. On an oscilloscope, it produces a digital square waveform. This sensor is located in the Distributor. What Tools do I Need for the Ignition Module Test? There are several ways to test this Ignition Control Module. An oscilloscope is the best way to check all of the input and output signals but it's not the only way. I'll show you just how. Anyway, if you have access to an oscilloscope, I have included photos of what the waveforms should look like. Whether you use a multimeter or an Oscilloscope, you'll be able to successfully diagnose this NO START CONDITION! So, here's the basic list: An LED Light. Test Light. Multimeter. A cheapie one will do. Repair Manual. For whatever other information this article does not cover. Helper. To help you crank the engine while you observe the LED light (or Test Light or Multimeter). By the way, you don't need an Automotive Scan Tool for any of these tests. We'll first check for the basics like Battery voltage and Engine Ground to the Ignition Control Module. Then we'll test the Ignition Coil Switching Signal that the Module generates in action and from the results you get you'll be able to pinpoint the problem to the Ignition Control Module (ICM) or the Ignition Coil or the Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) Sensor or completely eliminate these as the cause of the No Start Condition. IMPORTANT- All of the tests are ON CAR TESTS, do not remove the Ignition Control Module Assembly from the vehicle (all of the figures show the Module Assembly off of the vehicle but this is just for illustration purposes only). Also, the Battery must be in a fully charged condition for all tests in this article. And lastly, this Fast Test only tests for a NO SPARK / No Start Condition. TEST INFO Circuit Descriptions; Here are brief descriptions of the circuits that we'll be testing. You'll notice that there are no wire color descriptions. This is intentional. The color of the wires in the illustration will not match the ones on your vehicle. The good news is that no matter what color the wires are (on the vehicle), the circuit descriptions DO NOT CHANGE. You will be able to successfully diagnose this NO START CONDITION with this information. IMPORTANT- It will be necessary to test some of these circuits while the engine is being cranked. Be careful, use common sense and take all necessary safety precautions. Ignition Control Module Connector; 1- Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) Signal. 2- Spout. 3- 12 V at START. 4- 12 Volts (gray module) or IDM circuit (black module). 5- Ignition Coil Control Signal. 6- Ground. TEST 1 Checking for Power (12 V); We'll begin by checking that the Ignition Control Module is receiving 12 volts. I recommend using a wire piercing probe to accomplish all of the tests in this article. (click here to see a picture of this tool). Whatever method you use, the key here is to be careful. Remember to use common sense and take all safety precautions . IMPORTANT- The Ignition Coil, Ignition Control Module and the PIP Sensor receive 12 Volts from the same circuit. So if you test one, you test the others. 1 Put the multimeter in VOLTS DC mode. 2 It's not necessary to disconnect the Ignition Control Module (ICM). You'll probe the number 4 circuit of the Ignition Control Module Connector. 3 With the RED multimeter test lead and a suitable tool, probe the number 4 circuit wire of the Connector. 4 With the BLACK lead of the multimeter probe the BATT (-) NEGATIVE terminal. 5 Turn Key On with the Engine Off. Your Multimeter should register 12 Volts DC. CASE 1 If the Multimeter registered 12 Volts DC, All is good in the neighborhood, GO TO TEST 2. CASE 2 If the Multimeter DID NOT register 12 Volts DC, You must find out why you're missing this voltage. Without this voltage the Module, Ignition Coil, and the PIP Sensor will not work. TEST 2 Testing the Ground Circuit; Here we'll check that the Ignition Control Module (ICM) is receiving a good GROUND. This is done thru' the number 6 circuit of the Igntion Module Connector. 1 Put the multimeter in VOLTS DC mode. 2. With the BLACK multimeter test lead and a wire piercing probe, probe the Ignition Module Connector's number 6 circuit wire. 3 With the RED lead of the multimeter probe the BATT (+) POSITIVE terminal. Your Multimeter should register 12 Volts DC. CASE 1 If the Multimeter registered 12 Volts DC, All is good in the neighborhood, GO TO TEST 3. CASE 2 If the Multimeter DID NOT register 12 Volts DC, This means there is open in this circuit. Without this ground the Ignition Module will not function. Repair the circuit. EST 3 Ignition Coil Switching Signal; Now that you have verified the basics, in this test you're gonna' verify that the Ignition Control Module (ICM) is activating the Ignition Coil. Here you're going to use an LED test tool. Click here for a picture of this tool and how to make it. You can also use a Test Light for this test. Use an appropriate tool to pierce the wire and attach the LED test tool (to this tool). Be careful and use all necessary precautions. By the way, in case you want to see a more specific Ford Ignition Coil test, I’ve written one for troubleshootmyvehicle.com and you can see it here: Ford Ignition Coil Test. 1 Connect the RED wire of the LED to the Battery Positive Terminal. 2 Connect the BLACK wire of the LED to the number 5 circuit of the Ignition Control Module Connector 3 Have an assistant crank the engine. the LED test tool (or Test Light) should blink on and off as the engine is being cranked. Did this occur? CASE 1 The LED Light blinked On and Off as the engine was cranking, This means that the Ignition Control Module is triggering the Ignition Coil. So then, the Ignition Control Module is good and can been eliminated as the cause of the NO START condition. By a process of elimination, we can assume that the Ignition Coil is faulty and is the source of the NO START condition. Replace the Ignition Coil. CASE 2 The LED Light DID NOT blink On and Off as the engine was cranking, Re-check all of your connections and retry the test again. If still no light pulses on the test LED, GO TO TEST 4. TEST 4 Testing the PIP Signal; Here we'll check that the Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor (PIP) is being received by the Ignition Control Module (ICM). The PIP Signal is just Ford’s name for the Crankshaft Position Sensor Signal. Now, in case you’re wondering... the PIP Sensor is located inside the Distributor. This will be achieved by using the same LED test tool. Click here for a picture of this LED tool and how to make it. Do not use a Test Light for this test; With a suitable tool and with the key in the Off position, pierce the number 1 circuit wire of the Ignition Control Module Connector. Connect the BLACK wire of LED to the tool that is piercing the wire. Connect the RED wire of the LED to the BATTERY (+) POSITIVE terminal. Have an assistant crank the engine while you observe the LED. The LED should start to blink on and off as the engine is cranked. Is the LED blinking on and off as the engine is cranked? CASE 1 If the LED blinked On and OFF as your helper cranked the engine The Ignition Control Module (ICM) is BAD. Replace the Ignition Control Module. Here’s why: As you’re already aware, the Ignition Control Module needs: 1.) power in the form of 12 Volts. 2.) It needs a good path to ground. 3.) It needs the PIP Signal to start creating the Switching Signal the Ignition Coil needs to start sparking.. So, up until this point (in the testing) you have verified that the module does have power, that it does have ground and that it’s not creating a Switching Signal for the Ignition Coil. In this step you have confirmed that the PIP Sensor is generating a PIP Signal (as indicated by a blinking LED light). So, if the Ign. Module is getting power, ground and the PIP Signal (as evidenced by the blinking LED) is has to create a Switching Signal... if it doesn’t, it’s fried. CASE 2 The LED DID NOT blink On and OFF as your helper cranked the engine If you have no pulses, recheck all connections. Try again. If you still have no pulses. The Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor (PIP) is BAD and the cause of this NO START condition. You’ll need to replace the PIP Sensor to solve the No Start No Spark Condition on your Ford (or Mercury or Lincoln) vehicle. As mentioned earlier, the Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) Sensor is just a Crankshaft Position Sensor located inside the Distributor. This is the Sensor that tells the Ignition Control Module (ICM) when to start activating the Ignition Coil to start Sparking away. So, if this PIP Signal is missing (as indicated by the LED not blinking on and off), the Ignition Control Module will not function..." SEE Site for Diagrams
Source: by easyautodiagnostics.com
No Start and or Misfire, etc.; Thick Film Ignition (TFI) Testing, Overview & Diagrams, Fender Mounted Ignition Control Module (ICM); "...Whether your Ford or Mercury car or truck CRANKS but DOES NOT START or runs with a MISFIRE Condition, this article is for you. With the tests I'm gonna' show you, you'll be able to pinpoint the problem to the Ignition Control Module or the Ignition Coil or the Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor (PIP Sensor) or the Spark Plug Wires or the Distributor Cap. This article applies to both the Gray colored Ignition Control Module and the Black colored Ignition Control Module. The Gray colored Ignition Control Module is called the Push Start Module and the Black colored Ignition Control Module is called the Computer Controlled Dwell Module. These Ignition Control Modules (ICM) are not interchangeable but are tested in the exact same way. Also, the photos (in the image viewer) show some of the tests performed on a V8 engine. This might make you think that they don’t apply to your 3.0L, 3.8L V6... well nothing could be further from the truth. All of these test steps apply to both the V8, V6 and L6 Ford engines. For a complete list of applications, see the list at the bottom of the page. As you can see from the image of the Ignition Control Module (in the image viewer on the left), the tests apply to the fender mounted Ford Ignition Control Module. If you need to test the Distributor Mounted Ford Ignition Control Module, click here: How to test the Ford Distributor Mounted Ignition Control Module (ICM). To test Ford Coil-on-Plug Ignition Coils (4.6L and 5.4L V8 engines), click here: Ford Coil-on-Plug (COP) Ignition Coil Tests. Here's a little background information to help you diagnose this no spark condition. In a nutshell, when the system is working properly and you turn the key to crank and start your Ford car or truck: 1.The Distributor shaft starts to rotate which causes the PIP (Profile Ignition Pickup) Sensor to start generating its Crankshaft Position Signal. 2.The Ignition Control Module (ICM), upon receiving this PIP Signal, starts to 'open and close' the Ignition Coil's primary current. As you might already be aware, it's this action that makes the Ignition Coil Spark.3.The Fuel Injection Computer also receives the PIP Signal at the same time that the Ignition Module does.4.Once the engine STARTS, the Fuel Injection Computer takes over the Ignition Timing.The PIP Sensor is at the heart of this Fender Mounted Ignition Control Module and Ignition System. Here are some useful facts that you should be aware of about the PIP (Profile Ignition Pickup) Sensor: 1.The PIP Sensor is located in the Distributor.2.It's a Hall Effect type Sensor.3.It produces a digital square wave if its Signal is tested on an Oscilloscope. 4.This signal can also be tested with an LED Light (which is the method I'll use in this article). 5. 5.If it goes BAD, the your Ford car or truck will CRANK but NOT START. No expensive tools are required to test this type of Ignition System. Now, having said that, there some very specific tools that I recommend to use for the tests. So, here's the basic list:".. READ MORE
Source: by easyautodiagnostics.com
No Start; & Relay Connection pic in 92-96; "...The relay trigger wire (LG/R) comes from the ignition switch via the clutch switch or MLPS and should only be hot with the key in START and either the clutch fully depressed, OR the auto shifter in P or N. The solenoid trigger wire goes to the small terminal on the starter. If the relay fails, bridge between the 2 large studs to send power to the solenoid. If the starter still doesn't spin, crawl under the truck, remove the red plastic cover, and BRIEFLY bridge between the 2 large studs on the solenoid (using a heavy metal object with an insulated grip, like a screwdriver) to spin the starter (it won't engage the flywheel or crank the engine). If it still doesn't spin, replace the starter. 130A & heavier alternators use 2 fusible link wires. The Yellow wire goes to the stud on the side of the power distribution box, and feeds all other factory loads on the vehicle..."
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
OBD-II PIDs On Board Diagnostics "Parameter IDs"; "...are codes used to request data from a vehicle, used as a diagnostic tool. These codes are part of SAE standard J/1979, required to be implemented in all cars sold in North America since 1996. Typically, an automotive technician will use PIDs with a scan tool connected to the vehicle's OBD-II connector. The technician enters the PID. The scan tool sends it to the vehicle's bus (CAN, VPW, PWM, ISO, KWP. After 2008, CAN only). A device on the bus recognizes the PID as one it is responsible for, and reports the value for that PID to the busThe scan tool reads the response, and shows it to the technician..." READ MORE
Source: by wikipedia.org
OBD2 Metrics using iPhone/iTouch Installation & Review
Source: by boss (bossind, Steve) at FSB
OBD2 Metrics using iPhone/iTouch Installation pics in a 96
Source: by boss (bossind, Steve) at SuperMotors.net
Open Loop & Closed Loop Overview; "...Open Loop fuel control, the ECU takes its best guess at the injector Pulse Width (PW) to achieve a desired A/F ratio. With a Closed Loop system, the ECU can actually use Exhaust Gas Oxygen sensors to check and see how well it's doing for fuel control, and make adjustments as necessary, including updating its programming..." READ MUCH MORE
Source: by Ed H at musclemustangfastfords.com
Overview
Source: by Vincent C at autorepair.about.com
Overview
Source: by Car Sound  car-sound.com
Overview in a 96
Source: by Ford motorcraftservice.com
Overview, Forum, etc.
Source: by obdii.com
Overview; "...The engine control systems are used in conjunction with either a throttle body (CFI) injection or multi-point (EFI and SEFI) injection fuel delivery system or feedback carburetor systems depending on the year, model and powertrain. Although the individual system components vary slightly, the electronic control system operation is basically the same. The major difference is the number and type of output devices being controlled by the ECA. One of these electronic test devices has become the on-board computer itself. The Powertrain Control Modules (PCM), sometimes called the Electronic Control Assembly (ECA), used on toadies vehicles has a built in self testing system. This self test ability is called self-diagnosis. The self-diagnosis system will test many or all of the sensors and controlled devices for proper function. When a malfunction is detected this system will store a fault code in memory that's related to that specific circuit. You can access the computer to obtain fault codes recorded in memory by using an analog voltmeter or special diagnostic scan tool. This will help narrow down what area to begin testing. There are 3 electronic fuel control systems used by Ford Motor Company. These systems all operate using similar components and on-board computers. Self-Diagnostic on these systems will vary, but, the basic fuel control operation is the same. Ford uses the following systems: EEC-IV and EEC-V engine control system: used on most domestic built Ford vehicles since 1984. Non-NAAO EEC engine control system: used on import built Ford vehicles, referred to as Non-NAAO cars.MCU feedback carburetor system: used on most Ford vehicles before 1984 and some later model vehicles equipped with a V8 engine and feedback carburetor. Most Ford vehicles made after 1983 use the 4th generation Electronic Engine Control system, commonly designated EEC-IV. In 1994 the EEC-V system was introduced on some models. The diagnostic system on EEC-V provides 3 digit codes in place of 2 digit codes and monitors more components. .." READ MORE for Reading Codes & Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC's)
Source: by Ford via arrc.epnet.com
Parameter Identification (PID); "...The Parameter Identification (PID) mode allows access to powertrain control module (PCM) information. This includes analog and digital signal inputs and outputs along with calculated values and system status. There are two types of PID lists available and both are used throughout this manual. The first is the Generic (J1979) OBDII PID list. This is a standard set of PIDs for all manufacturers all scan tools must be able to access. The second is a Ford specific (J2190) list which can be accessed by an adequate scan tool. When accessing any of these PIDs, the values will be continuously updated. The Generic or Ford PID list provides definitions and values in appropriate units. For more information, refer to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2205 document. Generic OBD II PID List; from 2003/2004 Ford Factory Service Manual. READ MORE
Source: by paladinmicro.com
PCM Flash EEPROM Power Supply to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
PCM Relay to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
PCM to Check Engine Indicator Lamp (CEL) to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
PSOM & Odometer Not Working "..due to Bad diode in the alternator that put a rf signal into the speed sensor line. It turned out to be a bad diode in the alternator that put a rf signal into the speed sensor line. I unplugged the alternator electrical connector and it went away. I am a mechanic by trade and this was on a 2001 superduty that would die when it hit 1100rpm. I was doing my key on engine running selftest when the scanner could not complete it due to excessive vss. So i monitered my vss and when my target rpm was hit the pcm would have the speed limiter kick in and since there was no laod on the engine it would stall. Naturally I started unplugging stuff untill my interferance signal went away..."
Source: by Mr Bell & miesk5 at FSB
Readiness Monitors Overview
Source: by dnr.mo.gov
Relay Test, Ford (Bosch Type); "...Fuel pump relay switches, and other relays are similar to the starter solinoid, in that they make a high amperage connection through a switched low amperage connection. There are two smaller connections, and two larger connections. TO test it, apply 12v to one of the smaller connections, and ground the other smaller connection. (I used to small aligator clipped jumper wries separated by a small piece of cardboard to keep them from shorting against each other.) You should hear it click. Then check for continuity between the two larger connections.Now remove the power from the smaller connections and recheck continuity between the larger connections.With power, one should have continuity, without power it should be an open circuit (no continuity)..."
Source: by Poppy at fordforumsonline.com
Relay, Bosch Overview, Schematics, etc.
Source: by Craig U at classictruckshop.com
Removal & Swap in an 83 (5.8 from a 96 Econoline)
Source: by Marginallystable at FSB
Removal & Swap pics, 5.0 to 5.8 in a 96
Source: by bossind (boss, Steve) at SuperMotors.net
Removal & Swap; 5.0 to 5.8 in a 96
Source: by bossind (boss, Steve) at FSB
Removal in a 95 7.3L C-350 (Centurion Conversions)
Source: by BJS at SuperMotors.net
Removal in a 95 7.3L C-350 (Centurion Conversions)(must register to view pics, so see his SM site for pics)
Source: by BJS at fourdoorbronco.com
Repair Price Estimator, Bronco from 90-96 and other Fords; including labor & parts, shops in area, by Zip Code
Source: by RepairPal
Reprogramming TSB 97-09-08 in 96
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Scan Tool Instructions; Actron, Auto X-Ray, KAL
Source: by tradervar.com
Scan Tool Won’t Initiate Self-Tests; Vehicle Battery goes Dead, Short Solenoid Body Life, 4th Gear Starts in D/High Pressure may be caused by a malfunctioning Electronic Engine Control (EEC) Relay. The EEC relay is controlled by 12 volts from the ignition switch and is responsible for supplying voltage to the computer and solenoid body. If the relay contacts stick open, the complaints are as follows: Gas engine applications won’t start, Diesel will start and run, but have 4th gear starts in D, 2nd gear in 2 and 1, and maximum line pressure. If the contacts are stuck closed, the complaints may be as follows: Both gas and diesel engine application: Scan tool won’t work, vehicle battery goes dead, short solenoid body life. Note: Watch for corroded relay terminals and connectors on 89-91 E-series vans. The relay is very close to the right side battery and prone to corrosion problems especially on diesel ambulances..." read more, Diagrams are gone
Source: by ATC-Distribution Group Inc. atcdg.com via web.archive.org
Scangauge Review
Source: by Matt A at rmftc.com
Sensor Tech Library
Source: by autotap.com
Short Circuit; Cigar Lighter & OBD II Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC); "...found that my cig lighter's 12v vehicle power (VPWR) Lt Blue/White wire chaffed & shorted on ashtray frame. It caused Fuse 16 to blow itself..out (& in 96, this also caused the OBD II Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) not to "power up" @ pin 16)..."
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
Swap pics, 5.0 to 5.8 in a 96
Source: by bossind (boss, Steve) at SuperMotors.net
Symbols in Wiring Diagrams
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Testing, Overview & Diagrams, Thick Film Ignition (TFI), Distributor Mounted Ignition Control Module (ICM); "...Part I; In This Fast Test you'll be able to pinpoint the problem to the Ignition Control Module or the Ignition Coil or the Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor (PIP Sensor) in four easy test steps. This test will only help you in a Cranks but Does Not Start Condition. So then, before starting the tests, it's critical that you have checked and verified that there's NO SPARK present at the Ignition Coil. Why? Well, because if the Ignition Coil is sparking, it would be a clear indication that it and the Ignition Coil and the Crankshaft Position Sensor (PIP Sensor) are working. This article applies to both the Gray colored Ignition Control Module and the Black colored Ignition Control Module. The Gray colored Ignition Control Module is called the Push Start Module and the Black colored Ignition Control Module is called the Computer Controlled Dwell Module. These ignition control modules are not interchangeable. If you need the tests for the Ford Fender Mounted Ignition Control Module (ICM), click here. How Does the Ignition Control Module Work? Here's a little background information to help you diagnose this no spark condition. In a nutshell, when the system is working properly, at CRANK-UP and at all engine speeds, the Ignition Control Module controls the Ignition Coil. How? This is primarily done thru' the Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor Signal which is received by the Ignition Control Module (and also the ECM). The Ignition Control Module (ICM) upon receiving this signal, starts switching the Ignition Coil's Ground On and Off. As you may already know, it's this action that makes the Ignition Coil spark away. The Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor signal (more commonly called the PIP Signal) is critical for the Ignition Control Module to start sparking the Ignition Coil at START UP and at all engine speeds. The Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor is a Hall Effect type Crankshaft Position Sensor and produces a digital (On/Off) signal that can be seen with an LED or an oscilloscope. On an oscilloscope, it produces a digital square waveform. This sensor is located in the Distributor. What Tools do I Need for the Ignition Module Test? There are several ways to test this Ignition Control Module. An oscilloscope is the best way to check all of the input and output signals but it's not the only way. I'll show you just how. Anyway, if you have access to an oscilloscope, I have included photos of what the waveforms should look like. Whether you use a multimeter or an Oscilloscope, you'll be able to successfully diagnose this NO START CONDITION! So, here's the basic list: An LED Light. Test Light. Multimeter. A cheapie one will do. Repair Manual. For whatever other information this article does not cover. Helper. To help you crank the engine while you observe the LED light (or Test Light or Multimeter). By the way, you don't need an Automotive Scan Tool for any of these tests. We'll first check for the basics like Battery voltage and Engine Ground to the Ignition Control Module. Then we'll test the Ignition Coil Switching Signal that the Module generates in action and from the results you get you'll be able to pinpoint the problem to the Ignition Control Module (ICM) or the Ignition Coil or the Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) Sensor or completely eliminate these as the cause of the No Start Condition. IMPORTANT- All of the tests are ON CAR TESTS, do not remove the Ignition Control Module Assembly from the vehicle (all of the figures show the Module Assembly off of the vehicle but this is just for illustration purposes only). Also, the Battery must be in a fully charged condition for all tests in this article. And lastly, this Fast Test only tests for a NO SPARK / No Start Condition. TEST INFO Circuit Descriptions; Here are brief descriptions of the circuits that we'll be testing. You'll notice that there are no wire color descriptions. This is intentional. The color of the wires in the illustration will not match the ones on your vehicle. The good news is that no matter what color the wires are (on the vehicle), the circuit descriptions DO NOT CHANGE. You will be able to successfully diagnose this NO START CONDITION with this information. IMPORTANT- It will be necessary to test some of these circuits while the engine is being cranked. Be careful, use common sense and take all necessary safety precautions. Ignition Control Module Connector; 1- Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) Signal. 2- Spout. 3- 12 V at START. 4- 12 Volts (gray module) or IDM circuit (black module). 5- Ignition Coil Control Signal. 6- Ground. TEST 1 Checking for Power (12 V); We'll begin by checking that the Ignition Control Module is receiving 12 volts. I recommend using a wire piercing probe to accomplish all of the tests in this article. (click here to see a picture of this tool). Whatever method you use, the key here is to be careful. Remember to use common sense and take all safety precautions . IMPORTANT- The Ignition Coil, Ignition Control Module and the PIP Sensor receive 12 Volts from the same circuit. So if you test one, you test the others. 1 Put the multimeter in VOLTS DC mode. 2 It's not necessary to disconnect the Ignition Control Module (ICM). You'll probe the number 4 circuit of the Ignition Control Module Connector. 3 With the RED multimeter test lead and a suitable tool, probe the number 4 circuit wire of the Connector. 4 With the BLACK lead of the multimeter probe the BATT (-) NEGATIVE terminal. 5 Turn Key On with the Engine Off. Your Multimeter should register 12 Volts DC. CASE 1 If the Multimeter registered 12 Volts DC, All is good in the neighborhood, GO TO TEST 2. CASE 2 If the Multimeter DID NOT register 12 Volts DC, You must find out why you're missing this voltage. Without this voltage the Module, Ignition Coil, and the PIP Sensor will not work. TEST 2 Testing the Ground Circuit; Here we'll check that the Ignition Control Module (ICM) is receiving a good GROUND. This is done thru' the number 6 circuit of the Igntion Module Connector. 1 Put the multimeter in VOLTS DC mode. 2. With the BLACK multimeter test lead and a wire piercing probe, probe the Ignition Module Connector's number 6 circuit wire. 3 With the RED lead of the multimeter probe the BATT (+) POSITIVE terminal. Your Multimeter should register 12 Volts DC. CASE 1 If the Multimeter registered 12 Volts DC, All is good in the neighborhood, GO TO TEST 3. CASE 2 If the Multimeter DID NOT register 12 Volts DC, This means there is open in this circuit. Without this ground the Ignition Module will not function. Repair the circuit. EST 3 Ignition Coil Switching Signal; Now that you have verified the basics, in this test you're gonna' verify that the Ignition Control Module (ICM) is activating the Ignition Coil. Here you're going to use an LED test tool. Click here for a picture of this tool and how to make it. You can also use a Test Light for this test. Use an appropriate tool to pierce the wire and attach the LED test tool (to this tool). Be careful and use all necessary precautions. By the way, in case you want to see a more specific Ford Ignition Coil test, I’ve written one for troubleshootmyvehicle.com and you can see it here: Ford Ignition Coil Test. 1 Connect the RED wire of the LED to the Battery Positive Terminal. 2 Connect the BLACK wire of the LED to the number 5 circuit of the Ignition Control Module Connector 3 Have an assistant crank the engine. the LED test tool (or Test Light) should blink on and off as the engine is being cranked. Did this occur? CASE 1 The LED Light blinked On and Off as the engine was cranking, This means that the Ignition Control Module is triggering the Ignition Coil. So then, the Ignition Control Module is good and can been eliminated as the cause of the NO START condition. By a process of elimination, we can assume that the Ignition Coil is faulty and is the source of the NO START condition. Replace the Ignition Coil. CASE 2 The LED Light DID NOT blink On and Off as the engine was cranking, Re-check all of your connections and retry the test again. If still no light pulses on the test LED, GO TO TEST 4. TEST 4 Testing the PIP Signal; Here we'll check that the Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor (PIP) is being received by the Ignition Control Module (ICM). The PIP Signal is just Ford’s name for the Crankshaft Position Sensor Signal. Now, in case you’re wondering... the PIP Sensor is located inside the Distributor. This will be achieved by using the same LED test tool. Click here for a picture of this LED tool and how to make it. Do not use a Test Light for this test; With a suitable tool and with the key in the Off position, pierce the number 1 circuit wire of the Ignition Control Module Connector. Connect the BLACK wire of LED to the tool that is piercing the wire. Connect the RED wire of the LED to the BATTERY (+) POSITIVE terminal. Have an assistant crank the engine while you observe the LED. The LED should start to blink on and off as the engine is cranked. Is the LED blinking on and off as the engine is cranked? CASE 1 If the LED blinked On and OFF as your helper cranked the engine The Ignition Control Module (ICM) is BAD. Replace the Ignition Control Module. Here’s why: As you’re already aware, the Ignition Control Module needs: 1.) power in the form of 12 Volts. 2.) It needs a good path to ground. 3.) It needs the PIP Signal to start creating the Switching Signal the Ignition Coil needs to start sparking.. So, up until this point (in the testing) you have verified that the module does have power, that it does have ground and that it’s not creating a Switching Signal for the Ignition Coil. In this step you have confirmed that the PIP Sensor is generating a PIP Signal (as indicated by a blinking LED light). So, if the Ign. Module is getting power, ground and the PIP Signal (as evidenced by the blinking LED) is has to create a Switching Signal... if it doesn’t, it’s fried. CASE 2 The LED DID NOT blink On and OFF as your helper cranked the engine If you have no pulses, recheck all connections. Try again. If you still have no pulses. The Profile Ignition Pickup Sensor (PIP) is BAD and the cause of this NO START condition. You’ll need to replace the PIP Sensor to solve the No Start No Spark Condition on your Ford (or Mercury or Lincoln) vehicle. As mentioned earlier, the Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) Sensor is just a Crankshaft Position Sensor located inside the Distributor. This is the Sensor that tells the Ignition Control Module (ICM) when to start activating the Ignition Coil to start Sparking away. So, if this PIP Signal is missing (as indicated by the LED not blinking on and off), the Ignition Control Module will not function..." SEE Site for Diagrams
Source: by easyautodiagnostics.com
The On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) Executive; "...is a portion of the PCM strategy that manages the sequencing and execution of all diagnostic tests. It is the "traffic cop" of the diagnostic system. Each test/monitor can be viewed as an individual task, which may or may not be able to run concurrently with other tasks. The Diagnostic Executive enables/disables OBD monitors in order to accomplish the following: • Sequence the OBD monitors such that when a test runs, each input that it relies upon has already been tested. • Controls and co-ordinates the execution of the individual OBD system monitors: Catalyst, Misfire, EGR, O2, Fuel, AIR, EVAP and, Comprehensive Component Monitor (CCM). • Stores freeze frame and "similar condition" data • Manages storage and erasure of Diagnostic Trouble Codes as well as MIL illumination • Controls and co-ordinates the execution of the On-Demand tests: Key On Engine Off (KOEO), Key On Engine Running (KOER), and the Output Test Mode (OTM). • Performs transitions between various states of the diagnostic and powertrain control system to minimize the effects on vehicle operation. • Interfaces with the diagnostic test tools to provide diagnostic information (I/M readiness, various J1979 test modes) and responds to special diagnostic requests (J1979 Mode 08 and 09). The diagnostic also executive controls several overall, global OBD entry conditions. The Diagnostic Executive waits for 4 seconds after the PCM is powered before initiating any OBD monitoring. The Diagnostic Executive suspends OBD monitoring when battery voltage falls below 11.0 volts..."
Source: by Ford
The Parameter Identification (PID) mode allows access to powertrain control module (PCM) information. This includes analog and digital signal inputs and outputs along with calculated values and system status. There are two types of PID lists available and both are used throughout this manual. The first is the Generic (J1979) OBDII PID list. This is a standard set of PIDs for all manufacturers all scan tools must be able to access. The second is a Ford specific (J2190) list which can be accessed by an adequate scan tool. When accessing any of these PIDs, the values will be continuously updated. The Generic or Ford PID list provides definitions and values in appropriate units. For more information, refer to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2205 document. Read More
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
Waterproofing the EEC Discussion
Source: by members at FSB
Wiggle Test, Ford for Multi-Tester Pro
Source: by autodiagnos.com