BroncoLinks.Com Header Image
FORD BRONCO -> ENGINE & COOLING; swaps, specs, snorkels, vac. diagrams... -> ENGINE COOLING -> Radiator
WELCOME to MIESK5's BIG BRONCO LINKS - We now have over 26,000 LINKs!
This is a Ford Bronco, Truck & Van Technical & Parts LINKS site developed by the MIESK5 Family & is not affiliated with the Ford Motor Co. in any manner.
Although we initially developed this site for 78-96 Big Broncos, information in many Links also applies to F, E Series & Cars. UPDATE; all Links via web.archive may be down; Copy orig. URL & go to http://replay.waybackmachine.org/ to search for the new archived copy
Select A Link:
Build Date Stamp Location in a 96; "...The vehicle build date stamp is a four-digit number representing month and day of manufacture. On Bronco and F-150, F-250, F-350, the vehicle build date is stamped on the front surface of the radiator support on the passenger's side of the vehicle. For example, for a build date of January 24, the vehicle build date stamp reads 0124; for a build date of October 21, the vehicle date stamp reads 1021. Yellow ink is normally used for the date stamp. When the marking surface is painted the body color, the date stamp will be marked in red ink. Units from the Ontario Truck Plant (Code C) will be marked with silver ink..." in 1996 F-150, F-250, F-350, F-Super Duty and Bronco Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Coolant Leak May Occur at the Radiator Hose Joints, Hose Clamp TSB 95-6-16 for 95-96 BRONCO, ECONOLINE, F-150-350 SERIES; A coolant leak may occur at the radiator hose joints. This can be caused by: Debris on the sealing surface; Misassembly of the hose and/or clamp; Defective or damaged hose clamp; "Mega" hose clamps are to be used, if needed, because they have 30% more clamping force than clamps used in the past. They expand and contract with the thermal cycling of the joint, thus retaining their clamp load and efficiently sealing the joint over long periods of time. The screw-type dual-wire and worm gear style band clamps are less robust under climatic and system thermal cycling. THE "MEGA" CLAMPS WERE SPECIFICALLY SIZED FOR 1995 AND LATER VEHICLES. THEY ARE NOT APPROPRIATE FOR VEHICLES BEFORE THE 1995 MODEL YEAR BECAUSE THE JOINT SEAL CONFIGURATION AND DIMENSIONS ARE DIFFERENT. IF A 1995 VEHICLE IS RECEIVED WITH A DUAL-WIRE CLAMP, REPLACE IT WITH A COMPARABLE BAND CLAMP..." read more
Source: by Ford via Chilton
Coolant Leak May Occur at the Radiator Hose Joints, Hose Clamp TSB 95-6-16 for 95-96 BRONCO, ECONOLINE, F-150-350 SERIES; A coolant leak may occur at the radiator hose joints. This can be caused by: Debris on the sealing surface; Misassembly of the hose and/or clamp; Defective or damaged hose clamp; "Mega" hose clamps are to be used, if needed, because they have 30% more clamping force than clamps used in the past. They expand and contract with the thermal cycling of the joint, thus retaining their clamp load and efficiently sealing the joint over long periods of time. The screw-type dual-wire and worm gear style band clamps are less robust under climatic and system thermal cycling. THE "MEGA" CLAMPS WERE SPECIFICALLY SIZED FOR 1995 AND LATER VEHICLES. THEY ARE NOT APPROPRIATE FOR VEHICLES BEFORE THE 1995 MODEL YEAR BECAUSE THE JOINT SEAL CONFIGURATION AND DIMENSIONS ARE DIFFERENT. IF A 1995 VEHICLE IS RECEIVED WITH A DUAL-WIRE CLAMP, REPLACE IT WITH A COMPARABLE BAND CLAMP..." read more
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Description & Operation, Diagnosis & Testing, Removal & Installation, Service Procedures, Cleaning & Inspection & Special Service Tools/Equipment in a 96 from 1996 F-150, F-250, F-350, and Bronco Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Engine Coolant Concerns TSB 93-24-08 for 84-94 Bronco, F Series, Aerostar, Econoline & many others; See Table, check Coolant Level; "...ISSUE: Engine performance concerns such as hesitation or stall, rough idle, and/or poor fuel economy may be caused by the thermostat stuck in an open position or opening at a temperature lower than specified. ACTION: Use the following "Cooling System Diagnosis" procedure to diagnose a cooling system that may not be reaching normal operating temperature. Follow the "Thermostat Diagnosis" procedure to determine if the thermostat may be at fault. Check the thermostat without removing it from the vehicle by using Rotunda Service Coolant Temperature Monitor Harness 007-00064. DIAGNOSIS PROCEDURE; A new cooling system diagnosis procedure has been developed for engines that do not reach normal operating temperature. A new thermostat diagnosis procedure also has been developed, using a new service coolant temperature monitor harness. See chart for proper diagnostic procedure. NOTE: THIS PROCEDURE WILL DIAGNOSE ONLY COOLING SYSTEMS THAT MAY NOT BE REACHING NORMAL OPERATING TEMPERATURE. IT WILL NOT DIAGNOSE A THERMOSTAT THAT CAUSES AN ENGINE OVERHEAT CONDITION. THERMOSTAT DIAGNOSIS; NOTE: DISCONNECTING THE POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM) TO ATTACH A BREAKOUT BOX OR AN EEC IV MONITOR WILL ERASE THE ADAPTIVE LEARNING FROM MEMORY AND MAY "HIDE" A DRIVE CONCERN TEMPORARILY UNTIL THE ADAPTIVE LEARNING IS RE-LEARNED. NOTE: THIS PROCEDURE IS MOST ACCURATE IF PERFORMED INDOORS AT LESS THAN 100°F (38°C) AMBIENT TEMPERATURE. THIS TEST MAY BE PERFORMED WITH OR WITHOUT THE HOOD OPEN AND WITH THE ENGINE WARM OR COLD. CAUTION: ALWAYS VENT THE EXHAUST TO THE OUTSIDE WHEN PERFORMING THIS TEST. 1. Check the coolant level in the radiator and coolant recovery reservoir. 2. With the key in the "off" position, proceed as follows: a. Remove the engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor harness connector. b. Attach Rotunda Service Coolant Temperature Monitor Harness 007-00064 as a jumper between the PCM and the ECT. c. Attach Rotunda 73 Digital Multimeter 105-00051 or equivalent to the thermostat monitor harness. Voltage values (0-5vdc) may now be monitored while the sensor retains its connection to the wiring harness. NOTE: A ROTUNDA NEW GENERATION STAR TESTER (NGS) 007-00500 OR THE ROTUNDA SERVICE BAY DIAGNOSTIC SYSTEM (SBDS) 001-00001 MAY BE USED TO MONITOR THE ECT ON VEHICLES EQUIPPED WITH DATA COMMUNICATIONS LINK (DCL). THE SBDS SEQUENCE TO USE FOR THE SCREEN IS "TOOLBOX - ELECTRONIC ENGINE CONTROL AND DCL - ITEM". 3. Vehicles equipped with electric engine cooling fan(s) must have a fan running during this test (high or low speed may be used). Two methods may be used to turn the fan(s) on: a. Disconnect the A/C compressor clutch power supply and turn the climate control to A/C "ON". Or b. Disconnect the power supply to the cooling fan and supply 12 volts direct to the fan connector from the battery. NOTE: A GROUND MAY BE REQUIRED FOR SOME APPLICATIONS. 4. Place transmission in "park" or "neutral". NOTE: RUNNING THIS TEST WITH THE VEHICLE IN GEAR OR WITH THE A/C COMPRESSOR CLUTCH ENGAGED (RUNNING) WILL CAUSE IMPROPER DIAGNOSIS 5. Start the engine and allow to idle throughout this test: a. Allow engine to run for 2 minutes, then record ECT voltage. b. From now on, record ECT voltage every 60 seconds. c. When the ECT voltage trend changes direction or changes only slightly (0.03 volts or less) from the previous reading, record this as the thermostat opening voltage. d. Use the "Voltage and Corresponding Temperature Chart" shown below to obtain actual coolant temperatures. 6. If the opening voltage is GREATER than 0.75 volts (less than 180° F/ 82° C), or 0.85 volts (170° F/ 77° C) for 2.3L HSC engine only, replace the thermostat. Refer to the dealer Master Parts Catalog for correct thermostat usage. 7. If the thermostat opening voltage is LESS than 0.75 volts (greater than 180° F/ 82° C), or 0.85 volts (170° F/ 77° C) for 2.3L HSC engine only, the thermostat is good and should NOT be replaced. The "Cooling System Diagnosis Chart" should be referenced for further instructions. NOTE: The 10° F opening temperature difference for the 2.3L HSC engine is due to the ECT sensor location. OTHER APPLICABLE ARTICLES: NONE SUPERSEDES: 93-14-04 WARRANTY STATUS: INFORMATION ONLY..."
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
High Idle & Dieseling Troubleshooting Chart in a 94, from PCED Chart 7 for a 94; Preliminary Checks; Overheating or not Reaching Normal Operating Temperature, Vacuum Leaks, Throttle Plate & Linkage, Speed Control Chain Binding/Sticking, Air Intake Tube/ Intake Manifold Leaks..." READ MORE
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Installation in a 92
Source: by Bill Crozier (digitalbill) at SuperMotors.net
Installation in a 92
Source: by digitalbill (Bill Crozier) at FSB
Installation in a 96
Source: by MikeW (Mike W, BroncoNut) at FSB
Installation, Modine (heavy duty) in a 78-79
Source: by Paul E at ProjectBronco.com
Is That Water in My Engine Oil?; "...rusty, yellow and foam indicates that somehow the radiator fluid got inside the engine..."
Source: by gotengines.com
Leak Detection, General
Source: by aa1car.com
Mat Repair in a 96 5.8
Source: by spaustin (SOLD, spaustin889) at SuperMotors.net
Mat Repair in a 96 5.8 (pics are gone, see his SM Link)
Source: by spaustin (SOLD, spaustin889) at FSB
Modine 4 Row Thickness Difference vs OEM in an 89
Source: by Tim C (TnTbronco2, Trail Truck, Street Truck, Crazed, Broke, OoG) at FSB
Modine 4 Row Thickness Difference vs OEM in an 89
Source: by Tim C (TnTbronco2, Trail Truck, Street Truck, Crazed, Broke, OoG) at SuperMotors.net
Overview
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at fourdoorbronco.com
Plastic End Cap Leak Repair in a 96; " For around $35 they replaced the seals between the aluminum rad and plastic end tanks. I thought about doing it myself, but the crimps all have to be the same tightness or it'll leak again. With their jig/tools they had it done in less than 30 minutes. The rad will last you another 10 years or so. If all else fails, buy one from radiators.com for around $120 shipped..."
Source: by Blue'87GT at FSB
Plastic End Cap Leak Repair; "...Plastic radiator tank and gasket replacements. In this procedure the radiator is removed from the vehicle and placed in a special fixture to detach the damaged tank and/or gasket. The tank and/or gasket is replaced with a readily available new or restored part. Afterward, the radiator is reassembled and tested..."
Source: by NARSA narsa.org
Plastic End Cap Leak Repair; "Leaks in plastic end tanks can be filled with epoxy, covered with fiberglass and epoxy, or hot-air welded using nylon plastic filler rod. Welding plastic takes some skill and requires careful surface preparation to get good adhesion. The leak must first be "V" ground and sanded, then cleaned with wax and grease remover to assure a strong bond. The other alternative is to simply replace the damaged end tank. But the job is harder than it looks because the end tank must be pressed down on the core with about 150 lbs. of pressure while the header tabs are clamped in place. Radiator shops have the proper fixtures for doing this, but many underhood repair shops probably don't. Radiators with plastic end tanks are very vulnerable to steam erosion. If the coolant level is low and the engine starts to run hot, steam can erode and melt a hole right through an end tank. White deposits on the inside of the plastic is evidence that hot steam rather than coolant was flowing into the tank. If you find this kind of damage, check the thermostat and pressure test the system for leaks after the radiator has been repaired or replaced..."
Source: by Larry C at arrowheadradiator.com
Proliance 4 Row Brass Tank pics in an 88
Source: by danielzink (Dan Z) at pws.cablespeed
Proliance 4 Row Brass Tank pics in an 88
Source: by danielzink (Dan Z) at danielzink.com
Proliance 4 Row Brass Tank pics in an 88
Source: by danielzink (Dan Z) at SuperMotors.net
Removal in an 89 5.0
Source: by Waltman at FSB
Removal in an 89 5.0
Source: by Waltman at SuperMotors.net
Removal pics in an 80
Source: by DeepSeaSnake at SuperMotors.net
Repair in an 89 Centurion
Source: by Traveler (Centurion) at fourdoorbronco.com
Repair Price Estimator, Bronco from 90-96 and other Fords; including labor & parts, shops in area, by Zip Code
Source: by RepairPal
Shroud Fabrication for 4 Core in a 78
Source: by Mike S (Broncster, BRONKSTER) at SuperMotors.net
Shroud Modification (Single Core) for Heatbuster 4 Row in a 96 5.0; "...so I didn't find a 2 core shroud They go for about $130 at LMC so that was my last ditch. So I used my 1 core shroud on the heatbuster 4 core radiator. For the bottom clips, there are two sets of holes, if you use the outermost set, you can make the clips work on the bottom of the radiator to hold in the shroud. For the top shroud bolts, I used two self tapping screws with rubber washers as a temporary fix. After I put some miles on it, I'll determine if I need to move it up or down any and will do a more permanent mount. I put 50 miles on it today and had no issues with the fan coming into to contact with anything. I kind of zip tied the throttle body hose loosely to the body for now.I did have to notch the shroud to get my arm in there to put the fan back on, its tight but it works. I'm a little worried about the fan contacting the upper hose so I'll probably come up with a way to put a piece of thin removable sheetmetal over it so I can still remove fan easily. I'd also recommend changing your belt if you use the 1 core shroud as it makes it a little difficult to access it. I still plan to to put a 2 core shroud on when I find one at the yard, but just wanted to inform people that you can make the 1 core shroud work..."
Source: by Justin R at FSB
Shroud Modification (Single Core) for Heatbuster 4 Row pics in a 96 5.0; "...so I didn't find a 2 core shroud They go for about $130 at LMC so that was my last ditch. So I used my 1 core shroud on the heatbuster 4 core radiator. For the bottom clips, there are two sets of holes, if you use the outermost set, you can make the clips work on the bottom of the radiator to hold in the shroud. For the top shroud bolts, I used two self tapping screws with rubber washers as a temporary fix. After I put some miles on it, I'll determine if I need to move it up or down any and will do a more permanent mount. I put 50 miles on it today and had no issues with the fan coming into to contact with anything. I kind of zip tied the throttle body hose loosely to the body for now.I did have to notch the shroud to get my arm in there to put the fan back on, its tight but it works. I'm a little worried about the fan contacting the upper hose so I'll probably come up with a way to put a piece of thin removable sheetmetal over it so I can still remove fan easily. I'd also recommend changing your belt if you use the 1 core shroud as it makes it a little difficult to access it. I still plan to to put a 2 core shroud on when I find one at the yard, but just wanted to inform people that you can make the 1 core shroud work..."
Source: by Justin R at SuperMotors.net
Skid Plate pic in a 78
Source: by Paul G at SuperMotors.net
Throttle Body Coolant Line & By-pass reducer & Tee (one leg runs to throttle body) info & pics in a 90; "...An Agriculture Supply shop that builds custom crop sprayers had high temp plastic. One 1/2 inch T and one 1/2" to 3/8" coupler, new hoses, and new clamps..."
Source: by Supersanbob (Super Bronco) at SuperMotors.net
Throttle Body Coolant Line & By-pass reducer & Tee (one leg runs to throttle body); "...Some V engines also have a bypass hose which allows coolant to return directly to the water pump. There may also be a small circuit to the throttle body for de-icing, which typically returns to the radiator upper tank...."
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at fourdoorbronco.com
Throttle Body Coolant Line & By-pass reducer & Tee (one leg runs to throttle body); "...Some V engines also have a bypass hose which allows coolant to return directly to the water pump. There may also be a small circuit to the throttle body for de-icing, which typically returns to the radiator upper tank...."
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Throttle Body Coolant Line From Radiator Removal in an 89 5.0
Source: by Waltman at SuperMotors.net
Throttle Body Coolant Line From Radiator Removal in an 89 5.0
Source: by Waltman at FSB
Throttle Body Coolant Line From Radiator Splice Video in an 86 5.0
Source: by JKossarides ("The Bronco", Jean) at SuperMotors.net
Throttle Body Coolant Line From Radiator; "...Top hose goes to the filler neck, bottom is the coolant source from the metal fitting that screws into the intake manifold (look where the heater hose and ECT sensor go, there's a 3/8-inch nipple on it)..."
Source: by SigEpBlue (Steve) at FSB
Throttle Body Coolant Line From Radiator; Ford part number; "F2TZ8555B (20" mounting tabs) (2 core radiators);...in another post he wrote; ; 20" would be a 2 core radiator;24" would be for a 1 core radiator"
Source: by Need4racin (The 90 Bronco, Dean) at FSB
Throttle Body Coolant Line From Radiator; Ford part number; "Looked at my receipt today and the part # is F2TZ8555B, not F5 like I originally listed. Sorry about that. The parts guy said the 24" one was the same number but with "A" instead on "B" at the end. Also if anyone is interested, the part number for the water outlet on the lower intake manifold that has the port for the temp sensor and tubes for the heater core and TB is E8TZ-18B402-C and it too is still available..."
Source: by mbastianel at FSB