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FORD BRONCO -> ELECTRICAL; EEC/PCM, Self-Test, wiring diagrams... -> Electronic Engine Control (EEC); SELF TEST & Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC), OBD II, etc. -> Powertrain Control Module (Computer, EEC)
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Although we initially developed this site for 78-96 Big Broncos, information in many Links also applies to F, E Series & Cars. UPDATE; all Links via web.archive may be down; Copy orig. URL & go to http://replay.waybackmachine.org/ to search for the new archived copy
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DTC P1742 TSB 96-5-16 for 96 Bronco, E & F Series; Application Chart; "...The Check Engine lamp may illuminate and a Code P1742 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present. This may be caused by an improper signaling within the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). ACTION: Reprogram or replace the PCM. Refer to the following Service Procedure for details..."
EEC IV 5.0L 49 State & High Altitude Calibration Conversion (EEC IV Processor Change) TSB 92-16-9 for 92 Bronco, Econoline, F 150 & F 250
EEC Processor, MIL On with DTC 173 in Continuous Memory w/Pass Code 111 in KOEO & KOER, Replace EEC TSB 92-18-12 for 91-92 5.8L Bronco, Econoline & F Series
Electronic Modules, Protection From Damage by Static Electricity TSB 88-13-3 for All Light Truck Lines, etc.
Engine Hesitation/Surge with No DTCS in 5.0 & 5.8 Engines & with DTC 179 in 4.9 Engines TSB 95-2-10 for 91-92 Bronco & 91-94 F & E Series
Ford Fuel Injection and Electronic Engine Control: How to Understand, Service and Modify, 1988-1993 by Charles O. Probst
Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) ("Check Engine Light") Illumination; The "Check Engine" lamp may illuminate and a Code P0420 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present.TSB 96-15-13 for 96 Bronco, F Series & Econoline w/5.0L
Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) ("Check Engine Light") Illumination; The "Check Engine" lamp may illuminate and a Code P1742 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present.TSB 96-6-9 for 96 Bronco, F Series & Econoline w/E4OD
Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) Introduction TSB 88-05-07 for 88 Bronco, F series, & all others
Powertrain Control Module Reprogramming TSB 97-09-08 in 96
Powertrain Control Module Reprogramming TSB 99-4-3 in 96
Select A Link:
Electronic Engine Control History, Ford; 1978: "...Ford Motor Company introduces its first “Electronic Engine Control (EEC-I)” system. This system was very limited in the control of engine functions and only controlled ignition timing, EGR flow and the air pump's injection of air into the exhaust. 1979: Ford introduces the EEC-II system. This system added air/fuel ratio control (feedback carburetor), throttle kicker (controls engine idle speed during start up and AC function) and canister purge control to the ECC-I system. 1980: Ford introduces the EEC-III system. This system included all the sensors used by the ECC-II system, with the addition of a temperature Sensor. In 1981, the ECC-III system was modified to include controls for the new Electronic Fuel Injection systems. The EEC-III system was used on some models of Ford vehicles until 1984. 1980: In addition to the EEC-III system, Ford introduced another computer control system, called the “Microprocessor Control Unit (MCU)”. This system was used on a limited number of Ford vehicles up until 1991. 1983: Ford introduces the “Electronic Engine Control - IV (EEC-IV)” system. This system is capable of controlling a larger number of sensors, switches and actuators, and was used on a greater number of Ford vehicles. The ECC-IV system was used from 1983 to 1995. 1994: Ford introduces the EEC-V system (OBD-II). This is a highly sophisticated system that uses more special programs to enhance the computer's capability to monitor, detect and report failures, especially to the vehicle's emission system. This system was introduced on a limited number of 1994 and 1995 vehicles. Starting in 1996, all Ford vehicles (cars and light trucks) sold in the US are equipped with the EEC-V system..."
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
Check Engine Light (CEL) Overview in 92-96; "...The check engine warning indicator comes on when the electronic engine control system is not working properly. The check engine warning indicator comes on briefly when the ignition switch lock cylinder is turned to ON, and should turn off when the engine starts. If the check engine warning indicator does not come on when the ignition switch lock cylinder is turned to ON or if it comes on while the vehicle is moving, the system is malfunctioning..." read more
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Ford Control Module Overview, from Ford Fuel Injection and Electronic Engine Control: How to Understand, Service and Modify, 1988-1993
Source: by Charles O. Probst via yunost.ru
Adaptive Strategy Relearn Procedure: After repairs have been made and the KAM cleared drive the vehicle for at least ten miles to allow the PCM to relearn the values for optimum performance. Note: During the ten mile relearn drive, the vehicle may exhibit some driveability symptoms. These should be eliminated when the KAM has relearned the operating values.
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at Ford Bronco Zone Forums
Break-Out Box Overview; "...The breakout box put itself between the engine and the computer, and allowed the user to rapciously access the information being exchanged. They are simply a pinout board, mounted in a box, with associated cabling, like this... You can see the way the cabling hooks into the computer and then bridges into the automobile system. A closer look at the pinout board, little holes numbered to correspond to the numbered wires in the connector:The output is readable with a high impedance (this is IMPORTANT- Digital Volts Ohmeter (DVOM) No cheap knockoffs here, they may fry the computer by introducing their own voltage.) Not as fancy as a scanner which decodes the meaning for you, but valuable nonetheless because you can always look up every meaning of the output signal somewhere. Like on the factory manual CD or in the manual itself! FORD decided to make maximum use of the breakout box, and designed add ons to allow you to look at other systems. Here for example, is a harness (still looking new in the wrapper) that hooks into all the Distributorless Ignition System (DIS). It connects to the sensor connectors... allowing you full access to the signals, even while the engine is running: TFI (thick film Ignition) Yes there is a cable for this. Mine cost me $15. Here is the diagram ...There was an adapter for the breakout box that read the brake codes, AND... AND... did the procedure for properly bleeding them. It was called the anitlock Brake Adapter (ALA) and looks like this when installed in the unbilical for the breakout box: Betwen $125 and $200 on E-bay. Worth every penny if you want to look inside that engine..."
Source: by Glacier991 (Chris) at explorerforum.com
Calibration Code in Vehicle Emission Control Information (VECI) Decal; Contains Vacuum Diagram & Calibration Parts List for 88 & UP. On-Line for Free at Ford. Click "Quick Guides" in left panel; Scroll to & CLICK VECI Labels "Provides Vehicle Emission Control Information (VECI) and a related calibration parts list." Enter applicable info (need to know your Calibration number from your B-pillar sticker). Vacuum Diagram is the same as the one on the core support or hood or air filter cover. Suggest Right Clicking this Hot Link & Open in New Window.
Source: by Ford motorcraftservice.com
Calibration Code Location & pic; on PCM @ Drivers side kick panel. "...The 1996-2007 Ford codes are directly above the UPC stamp on the white label which is glued to the ECU connector, and on a black plastic cover on the computer J3 port. Ford Codes are always 3 letters and one number; also see your Calibration number from your B-pillar sticker..."
Source: by Westers Garage
Calibration Code Overview & pic; "...Using the Ford Calibration Code System Ford Motor Company assigned a "Calibration Code" to All makes and models of Ford, Lincoln and Mercury vehicles for mode years 1996 through 2002. This Ca Code grouped All emssion control components into a parts list. The CaL Code number can be located on a printed label either on the door frame or on the electronic engine control (EEC) connector on or near the firewall. (See the photo below). Please be careful to locate the correct CaL Code since many resemble each other. Pay attention to the location details for your specific sensor. For model years before and after 1996- 2002, please refer to the specific Applicaton Guide for your vehicle..."
Source: by walkerproducts.com
Check Engine Light (CEL) Overview in a 96; "...The light comes on briefly when you turn the ignition key to ON, but it should turn off when the engine starts. If the light does not come on when you turn the ignition to ON or if it comes on and stays on when you are driving, have your vehicle serviced as soon as possible. This indicates a possible problem with one of the vehicle’s emission control systems. You do not need to have your vehicle towed in. If the light turns on and off at one (1) second intervals while you are driving the vehicle, it means that the engine is misfiring. If this condition persists, damage could occur to the engine or catalytic convertor. Have your vehicle serviced at the first opportunity. You do not need to have your vehicle towed in. If the light turns on and off on rare occasions while you are driving, it means that a malfunction occurred and the condition corrected itself. An example of a condition which corrects itself occurs when an engine running out of fuel begins to misfire. In this case, the Check EngineWarning Light may turn on and will then set a Diagnostic Trouble Code DTC) indicating that the engine was misfiring while the last of the fuel was being consumed. After refueling, the Check Engine Warning Light will turn off after the vehicle has completed three consecutive warmup cycles without a misfire condition occurring.A warm up cycle consists of engine start from a cold condition (engine at ambient temperature) and running until the engine reaches normal operating temperature. On the fourth engine start up, the Check EngineWarning Light will turn off as soon as the engine begins to crank. It is not necessary to have the engine serviced. Under certain conditions, the Check EngineWarning Light may come on if the fuel cap is not properly installed. If the Check EngineWarning Light comes on and you suspect that the fuel cap is not properly installed, pull off the road as soon as it is safely possible and turn off the engine. Remove and replace the fuel cap, making sure it is properly seated. After completing the three consecutive warm upcycles and on the fourth engine start up, the Check Engine Warning Light should turn off. If the light does not go off after the fourth engine restart, have your vehicle serviced by your dealer or a qualified technician..."
Source: by Ford via Hiller Ford
Check Engine Light (CEL; Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL)) Overview in a 96; "...The check engine warning indicator comes on when the electronic engine control system is not working properly. The CHECK ENGINE warning indicator comes on briefly when the key is turned to RUN, and should turn off when the engine (6007) starts. If the CHECK ENGINE warning indicator does not come on when the key is turned to RUN or if it comes on while the vehicle is moving, the system is malfunctioning. NOTE: If the vehicle is equipped with dual fuel tanks (9002), the CHECK ENGINE light may come on if fuel is restricted to the engine or if the fuel flow is momentarily disrupted because of an empty fuel tank before switching to the auxiliary fuel tank. This condition is normal and the CHECK ENGINE light should go off sometime after fuel flow is restored..." from 1996 F-150, F-250, F-350, Bronco, F-Super Duty Motorhome Chassis Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Check Engine Light Location & Operation in an 88; "...As soon as you turn the key foreward to start the bronc, the light should come on, then once the truck is started it should come back on for about 3 secs then go out. it\'s actually stealthily hidden not in the guage cluster but in the black info strip on the gear shift side if the dash, just between the upper and lower trim pieces, your abs, low voltage, 4x4 and right signal indicator are there aswell. if the light fails to come on and check, first look closely for a small piece of electrical tape covering the spot where the light should be( the cheapest fix), if not found take the trim piece off and check for a missing bulb( 2nd most common fix) if the bulb is there change it. then it should come on. if the truck doesnt run the light should still come on when you turn the switch to power. if the battery isn't dead..."
Source: by tiresmok at answers.yahoo.com
Clearing Keep Alive Memory: To clear the KAM, disconnect the battery negative terminal for five minutes or more (preferably 15 minutes).
Source: by Ford via miesk5 at Ford Bronco Zone Forums
Dash Harness pic in a 96 F 150; "...some connectors have been removed..."
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) (Test Connector) to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
DTC 15 No keep Alive Memory power; O = KOEO test key on engine off - No keep Alive Memory power (pin 1) or bad Electronic Control Assembly (EEC, ECA Processor); M = in memory - after separator(10) in KOEO test- Keep Alive Memory (KAM) (pin 1) was interrupted
Source: by Tomco Inc. tomco-inc.com
DTC 15 Pin-Point Testing in an 86
Source: by Various Sources via miesk5 at Ford Bronco Zone Forums
DTC P1605 - Keep Alive Memory Test Failure; "... Indicates the PCM has experienced an internal memory test failure. However there are external items that can cause this DTC. Battery terminal corrosion Damaged PCM KAPWR to PCM interrupt/open Loose battery connection If KAPWR is interrupted to the PCM, because of a battery or PCM disconnect, DTC can be generated on the first power-up..."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1633 - Keep Alive Power Voltage Too Low; "... Indicates that the Keep Alive Power (KAPWR) circuit has experienced a power interrupt. Open KAPWR circuit. Damaged PCM. Intermittent KAPWR Circuit.."
Source: by slingblade at The National Lightning Owners Club
DTC P1742 TSB 96-5-16 for 96 Bronco, E & F Series; Application Chart; "...The Check Engine lamp may illuminate and a Code P1742 may be stored in memory. There may be no driveability concerns present. This may be caused by an improper signaling within the Powertrain Control Module (PCM). ACTION: Reprogram or replace the PCM. Refer to the following Service Procedure for details..."
Source: by Ford via Chilton
DTCs for 95-96 & Possible Causes
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
E4OD Controls Overview, Sensors, DTC (s) & Diagram; Powertrain Control Module (PCM) 12A650: On vehicles equipped with gasoline engines, the operation of the E4OD automatic transmission is controlled by the powertrain control module. Many input sensors provide information to the powertrain control module, which then controls the actuators that affect transmission operation..." READ MUCH MORE
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
E4OD to C 6 EEC Swap Info in a 95; "..."...I can make the electrical work Just the cost of the computer, $50-$200 depending on your shoping skills. 1994-95 5.0L Mustang (manual trans) F4ZF-12A650-EA T4M0, A1 CARDONE Part # 785918 ,STANDARD MOTOR PRODUCTS Part # EM10101..."
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at FSB
EEC IV 5.0L 49 State & High Altitude Calibration Conversion (EEC IV Processor Change) TSB 92-16-9 for 92 Bronco, Econoline, F 150 & F 250
Source: by Ford via Chilton
EEC IV Capacitor Repair in a 90 5.8
Source: by seedpress (dolittle) at Ford Bronco Zone Forums
EEC IV Capacitor Repair in a 90 5.8
Source: by dolittle (seedpress) at FSB
EEC IV Capacitor Repair, Failures Due to Age; "...(A9x and same years ECM's) The patient in question is a remanufactured A9L unit. This ECM is the one from a little notch project I'm working on. It started giving some problems starting up, engine flooding, random hesitation, missing and stalls. I opened up the ECM (the car is running with a A9S unit) after the owner brought it for a checkup.What you see is the typical electrolytic capacitors leak, causing intermittent shorts/opens to the neighboring circuits/components and symptoms as the ones explained. Worst case scenarios with this type of failure, is a permanent no start and permanent damage to the PWB preventing it could be repaired. As soon as I replace the capacitors I'll update with the pictures showing the repairs. The following capacitor does not show any leakage problems however, it will also be replaced as a preventative measure..." read more
Source: by Joel5.0 at sbftech.com
EEC IV Capacitor, Burnt PCM pic in a 94; "...the capacitors inside burned and leaked on the board. it happened to all of them, one was worse then the others..."
Source: by imlikeojnow (Ken) at FSB
EEC Strategies "...Start / Crank, Cold Start & Warm Up, Cold Drive-Away, Warm Idle, Warm Cruise, Full-Throttle Acceleration, Deceleration; Failure Mode & Adaptive Strategy
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
EEC V (OBD II) Connector Pin-Out Diagram & Overview; "...EEC-V uses a new 104-Pin connector to accommodate more sensors and actuators to help it grow beyond just engine and transmission control. The new EEC also had to apply to newer 1996 government regulations, these were labeled as �On-Board-Diagnostics II,� and they required a new test plug called the Diagnostic Link Connector. All brands sold in the USA had to use the same test connector, and it has to be within reach of the driver�s seat..."
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
EEC-IV Connector Pin-Out Diagram & Overview
Source: by Fireguy50 (Ryan M) at fordfuelinjection.com
EEC-IV Pin-Outs, Detailed
Source: by Fireguy50 (Ryan M) at fordfuelinjection.com
EEC-IV System Has NO Control Over the Following Items; "...Fuel quantity and quality; Damaged or faulty ignition components; Internal Engine Condition - rings, valves, Timing belt, etc.; Starter & Battery circuit; Dual Hall sensor; TFI or DIS module; Distributor condition or function; Camshaft sensor; Crankshaft sensor; Ignition or DIS coil; Engine governor module..."
Source: by Ford via arrc.epnet.com
Electronic Engine Control (EEC) Overview, Ford; EEC I & EEC II; "...These two "modules" used a common processor and memory so they can be described together. The processor was a 12 bit micro manufactured by Toshiba. The Ford internal code name for it was "PM-11" or "Poor Man's 11" implying it was a stripped down version of the, then popular, Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-11 computer. A PDP-11 was used in a vehicle in the first half of the 1970s for "proof of concept". In reality there was very little in common between these two computer architectures. This chip was never commercially available. This 12 bit processor was the only commercially available chip to feature all four mathematical functions (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) at the time. The choice of 12 bits was not accidental. For accuracy, it was determined that formulas needed to be able to resolve 1 part in 1000 or about 10 bits. Another bit was required for sign. This, logically, was rounded up to 12 bits which also resulted in an address space of 16 kilo-words. There was no "stack" for subroutine calls and returns. Rather the Instruction Pointer Register was "swapped" with another register that had been previously filled with the address of the target subroutine. Returning was accomplished by swapping back. All code was written in assembly language. The EEC-II controlled air-fuel ratio via the Ford proprietary model 7200 Variable Venturi (VV) Carburetor. This was the last carburetor designed and built by Ford US. It was considered to be the pinnacle of carburetor design. Air-fuel ratio was controlled by a stepper motor that operated a rack which moved a pintel that opened/closed the float bowel vent. When closed, no air could enter the bowel and the carburetor was lean. When open, the carburetor was rich. While this carburetor worked well, it was extremely expensive to manufacture. Each carburetor was hand calibrated in a pressure controlled room..." Read More
Source: by wikipedia.org
Engine Air/Fuel Ratio Control Assembly Depiction; The MCU is programmed to interface with various types of sensors, switches and actuators to perform engine control functions including air/fuel ratio control. - 80.6 MB pdf
Source: by Ford fordinstallersupport.com
Failure Mode Effects Management (FMEM) Overview; "...In FMEM mode, the computer is receiving a sensor signal that is outside the limits set by the calibration strategy. In this mode, the computer uses an alternate strategy to maintain reasonable vehicle operation in spite of the fault. The following chart lists the system faults which will turn on the CHECK ENGINE light in this mode. The error code associated with this system fault is stored in Keep Alive Memory (KAM). If the fault is no longer present, the light will turn off and vehicle will return to normal vehicle strategy. The error code stored when the light was on was not erased. This code is one of the continuous error codes and can be accessed by running the KOEO self-test..."
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Ford Fuel Injection and Electronic Engine Control: How to Understand, Service and Modify, 1988-1993; Scroll Down on First Page, Click on each Section, then on next page, click on the pdf file; the complete book is over 85MB pdf and can be downloaded @ http://www.yunost.ru/docs/Ford-injectors-book/Book.pdf
Source: by Charles O. Probst via yunost.ru
Freeze Frame Data & No Codes; Another advantage of OBD II is the freeze frame data function of the scan tool. Whenever an emissions related DTC is set, the MIL will illuminate and a freeze frame will be set in the PCM’s memory. The freeze frame should contain, but isn’t limited to, the following data: Engine load (calculated) , Engine RPM , Short- and long-term fuel trim, Vehicle speed, Coolant temperature, Intake manifold pressure, Open/closed loop operation, Fuel pressure (if available), DTC; In this generic scan tool feature, you can’t get DTCs. But you can get a serial data stream that will update a minimum of two times a second. More importantly, you will have access to at least 16 data parameters and a 66-frame movie of ECU/PCM data. The most important function of any scan tool is to diagnose intermittent problems. Listed below are my reasons why the movie/snap-shot is so valuable! On slower baud rate systems, [b]an out-of-range sensor may take several frames of data before a DTC is set. But it would still cause a noticeable driveability problem on the vehicle. And it still might not set a DTC. Duplicating the customer’s complaint with a road test and a movie/ snap-shot may be the only way to properly diagnose the vehicle..." READ MORE
Source: by Gary G at asashop.org
Fuel Trim; "...Fuel trim refers to adjustments being made dynamically to the base fuel table to get the proper ratio of fuel to air. Short term fuel trim refers to adjustments being made in response to temporary conditions. Long term fuel trim is used to compensate for issues that seem to be present over a much longer period. Fuel trims are expressed in percentages; positive values indicate lean (add fuel) and negative values indicate rich (subtract fuel). Fuel trim banks refer to the cylinder banks in a V style engine. Cylinder #1 is always in bank 1. Fuel trim is generally calculated by using a wide set of data values, including front O2 sensors, intake air temperature/pressure (or the more elegent air mass sensor), engine (coolant) temp, anti-knock sensors, engine load, throttle position (and change in throttle position), and even battery voltage can effect fuel trim. Long term fuel trim generally should not exceed +- 10%. Generally, and for OBD II,The HO2S detects the presence of oxygen in the exhaust and provides the PCM with feedback indicating a rich or lean condition. A correction factor is added to the fuel injector pulsewidth calculation according to the Long and Short Term Fuel Trims as needed to compensate for variations in the fuel system..."
Source: by miesk5 at FSB
Fuse 1 Blown on 4.9L Engine in Short Circuits, Common Locations TSB 95-02-11 for 94-95 Bronco & F Series
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Fuse 1 Blown on 4.9L Engine in Short Circuits, Common Locations TSB 95-02-11 for 94-95 Bronco & F Series
Source: by Ford via Chilton
Fuse 13 Blown, Stop & Hazard Lamps, Stop Sensor for Anti-Lock Brakes (ABS) Speed Control & PCM Short Circuits, Common Locations TSB 95-02-11 for 94-95 Bronco & F Series; wire harness may be pinched/shorted on steering column support behind the dash where the 14401 wire assy may come in contact w/a sharp edge on dash panel wall, I had same short here too & caused E4OD's TCIL (OD switch-LED) to blink like a friggin pia; wires pinched @ brake/tail lights, my 96's stop/turn/tail lights wires were almost cut in half on passenger side against 1/4 panel (inner); wires pinched @ high mount brake light & @ driver's left hand seat belt anchor bolt @ base of B Pillar. See the location diagram
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Hardware Limited Operation Strategy (HLOS) Overview; "...HLOS mode is used when the system fault(s) is too extreme for the FMEM mode to handle. In HLOS mode, all software operations have stopped and the computer is running on hardware control only. The default strategy for this mode has a minimal calibration just to allow the vehicle to operate until it can be serviced. NOTE: IN HLOS MODE YOU WILL NOT GET ERROR CODES. The MIL light is turned on as a bulb check when the ignition key is first turned ON. The EEC IV computer turns off the bulb as soon as it receives the PIP (crank) signal. If the light stays on during cranking, the computer is not receiving the PIP signal..."
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Identification, Bronco & Ford; "Every computer has a main sticker on the 60-pin connector that identifies the computer and holds the most information about the computer. If you have an EEC in your hands and wonder what it came out of this list is for you. If you are looking for an EEC in a junkyard or swap meets this is for you too. If you just wondered what computers Ford used in which vehicle this is also for you. I would not be upset if you printed this page off for your records, in fact I recommend taking it with you so you have an advantage finding that special EEC..."
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
J1850 Bus Positive/Data Positive & Negative/Data Negative (Return): MIESK5 NOTE, I think this is from/to Diagnostic Link Connector (DLC) (Test Connector) and then to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Location pic in 84-86
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
Location pic in 87-96
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
Location, Bronco; "1985-1986 right of steering wheel; 1987-1996 behind drivers side kick panel"
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
MAF Conversion pics & part number in a 95 351W
Source: by Frank C (NDIXIE, AKMUD) at SuperMotors.net
Malfunction Indicator Light (MIL) Introduction TSB 88-05-07 for 88 Bronco, F series, & all others
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at fourdoorbronco.com
NO CODE; IN HLOS MODE YOU WILL NOT GET ERROR CODES. Hardware Limited Operation Strategy (HLOS) Overview; "...HLOS mode is used when the system fault(s) is too extreme for the FMEM mode to handle. In HLOS mode, all software operations have stopped and the computer is running on hardware control only. The default strategy for this mode has a minimal calibration just to allow the vehicle to operate until it can be serviced. NOTE: IN HLOS MODE YOU WILL NOT GET ERROR CODES. The MIL light is turned on as a bulb check when the ignition key is first turned ON. The EEC IV computer turns off the bulb as soon as it receives the PIP (crank) signal. If the light stays on during cranking, the computer is not receiving the PIP signal..."
Source: by Ford via Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
OBD II Code Reader Overview & pic
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
OBD II Test Connector Location pic in a 96; Boss Has a cord plugged into it (end rolled up on tranny hum carpet) in this pic; is under of ashtray, to right
Source: by bossind (boss, Steve) at FSB
OBD II Test Connector Location pic in a 96; Boss Has a cord plugged into it (end rolled up on tranny hum carpet) in this pic; is under of ashtray, to right
Source: by bossind (boss, Steve) at SuperMotors.net
OBD-II PIDs On Board Diagnostics "Parameter IDs"; "...are codes used to request data from a vehicle, used as a diagnostic tool. These codes are part of SAE standard J/1979, required to be implemented in all cars sold in North America since 1996. Typically, an automotive technician will use PIDs with a scan tool connected to the vehicle's OBD-II connector. The technician enters the PID. The scan tool sends it to the vehicle's bus (CAN, VPW, PWM, ISO, KWP. After 2008, CAN only). A device on the bus recognizes the PID as one it is responsible for, and reports the value for that PID to the busThe scan tool reads the response, and shows it to the technician..." READ MORE
Source: by wikipedia.org
Open Loop & Closed Loop Overview; "...Open Loop fuel control, the ECU takes its best guess at the injector Pulse Width (PW) to achieve a desired A/F ratio. With a Closed Loop system, the ECU can actually use Exhaust Gas Oxygen sensors to check and see how well it's doing for fuel control, and make adjustments as necessary, including updating its programming..." READ MUCH MORE
Source: by Ed H at musclemustangfastfords.com
Overview; "...The engine control systems are used in conjunction with either a throttle body (CFI) injection or multi-point (EFI and SEFI) injection fuel delivery system or feedback carburetor systems depending on the year, model and powertrain. Although the individual system components vary slightly, the electronic control system operation is basically the same. The major difference is the number and type of output devices being controlled by the ECA. One of these electronic test devices has become the on-board computer itself. The Powertrain Control Modules (PCM), sometimes called the Electronic Control Assembly (ECA), used on toadies vehicles has a built in self testing system. This self test ability is called self-diagnosis. The self-diagnosis system will test many or all of the sensors and controlled devices for proper function. When a malfunction is detected this system will store a fault code in memory that's related to that specific circuit. You can access the computer to obtain fault codes recorded in memory by using an analog voltmeter or special diagnostic scan tool. This will help narrow down what area to begin testing. There are 3 electronic fuel control systems used by Ford Motor Company. These systems all operate using similar components and on-board computers. Self-Diagnostic on these systems will vary, but, the basic fuel control operation is the same. Ford uses the following systems: EEC-IV and EEC-V engine control system: used on most domestic built Ford vehicles since 1984. Non-NAAO EEC engine control system: used on import built Ford vehicles, referred to as Non-NAAO cars.MCU feedback carburetor system: used on most Ford vehicles before 1984 and some later model vehicles equipped with a V8 engine and feedback carburetor. Most Ford vehicles made after 1983 use the 4th generation Electronic Engine Control system, commonly designated EEC-IV. In 1994 the EEC-V system was introduced on some models. The diagnostic system on EEC-V provides 3 digit codes in place of 2 digit codes and monitors more components. .." READ MORE for Reading Codes & Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTC's)
Source: by Ford via arrc.epnet.com
Overview; "...There were two different EEC-III modules; Feedback Carburetor (FBC) and Central Fuel Injection (CFI - similar to GM Throttle Body Injection). The module size and shape were approximately the same as the EEC-II and still utilized the external memory module. The two module had differently keyed connector to prevent accidental insertion in the wrong vehicle. The FBC module controlled the same Ford 7200 VV Carburetor as the EEC-II. The CFI module fired 2 high pressure (approximately 40 psi) injectors that were mount in a throttle body mounted to a traditional intake manifold in the center valley of the 5.0L (302 cid) engine. CFI was available on all Ford vehicles with the 5.0. The processor was designed and manufactured by Motorola. It featured 8 bit data length, 10 bit instruction length and a 13 bit address length. The address space was "paged", meaning you could not directly address all of the address space without special instructions. There were 4 pages. Page 0 was for normal (background) code, page 1 was for interrupt code, page 2 was also for background, but could only be accessed by a special "Jump Page" instruction from page 0. Page 3 was used to store parameteric ("calibration") data or additional interrupt level code. This chip was never sold commercially. Like EEC-I and II, all code was written in assembly language.While all processor chips were manufactured by Motorola, the modules were designed and assembled by either Motorola, Toshiba or Ford. The designs were "functionally equivalent" but slightly different components were used. Motorola optimized their design to use as many of their own components as possible..."
Source: by wikipedia.org
Parameter Identification (PID); "...The Parameter Identification (PID) mode allows access to powertrain control module (PCM) information. This includes analog and digital signal inputs and outputs along with calculated values and system status. There are two types of PID lists available and both are used throughout this manual. The first is the Generic (J1979) OBDII PID list. This is a standard set of PIDs for all manufacturers all scan tools must be able to access. The second is a Ford specific (J2190) list which can be accessed by an adequate scan tool. When accessing any of these PIDs, the values will be continuously updated. The Generic or Ford PID list provides definitions and values in appropriate units. For more information, refer to the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J2205 document. Generic OBD II PID List; from 2003/2004 Ford Factory Service Manual. READ MORE
Source: by paladinmicro.com
PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
PCM Flash EEPROM Power Supply to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
PCM Relay to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
PCM to Check Engine Indicator Lamp (CEL) to PCM in PCM Connector Pin-Out Diagram with Circuit Functions in a 96 5.0 and 5.8 (Scroll Down) from 1996 F-150, 250, 350 (4x4), and Bronco Vehicles Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Pin Outs, Bronco & Ford Truck & Van: 4.9, 460, 5.0, 5.8
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
Powertrain Control Module Reprogramming TSB 97-09-08 in 96
Source: by Ford via thedieselstop.com
Powertrain Control Module Reprogramming TSB 99-4-3 in 96
Source: by Ford via stangnet.com
Program Codes, Bronco & Ford
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
Rare Location of Early EEC Above Gas Pedal pic
Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net
Removal & Swap pics, 5.0 to 5.8 in a 96
Source: by bossind (boss, Steve) at SuperMotors.net
Removal & Swap; 5.0 to 5.8 in a 96
Source: by bossind (boss, Steve) at FSB
Removal in a 95 7.3L C-350 (Centurion Conversions)
Source: by BJS at SuperMotors.net
Removal in a 95 7.3L C-350 (Centurion Conversions)(must register to view pics, so see his SM site for pics)
Source: by BJS at fourdoorbronco.com
Removal Instructions, Bronco
Source: by Westers Garage westersgarage.eidnet.org
Replacement, when to and when not to Tips
Source: by AutoTap
Scan Tool Won’t Initiate Self-Tests Troubleshooting in EEC-IV; SIG-RTN, Self-Test Output circuit, etc.
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
Scan Tool Won’t Initiate Self-Tests; malfunctioning Electronic Engine Control (EEC) Relay in a 92; Jeremy wrote on Page 2; "...I was able to get codes the old fashioned way by counting the flashes on dashboard, so I think that would eliminate any prospect of it being something in the wiring; ....As luck would have, it appears that changing out the old EEC relay did the trick. At first I didn't think it would. Instead of using wire from the self test connector to the battery, I plugged it directly into the connector on the tool and went through the KOEO code retreival process and lo and behold I got codes..I even got the KOER test to work as well..."
Source: by Jeremy M (Big '92, jermil01) & miesk5 at FSB
Scan Tool Won’t Initiate Self-Tests; Vehicle Battery goes Dead, Short Solenoid Body Life, 4th Gear Starts in D/High Pressure may be caused by a malfunctioning Electronic Engine Control (EEC) Relay. The EEC relay is controlled by 12 volts from the ignition switch and is responsible for supplying voltage to the computer and solenoid body. If the relay contacts stick open, the complaints are as follows: Gas engine applications won’t start, Diesel will start and run, but have 4th gear starts in D, 2nd gear in 2 and 1, and maximum line pressure. If the contacts are stuck closed, the complaints may be as follows: Both gas and diesel engine application: Scan tool won’t work, vehicle battery goes dead, short solenoid body life. Note: Watch for corroded relay terminals and connectors on 89-91 E-series vans. The relay is very close to the right side battery and prone to corrosion problems especially on diesel ambulances..." read more, Diagrams are gone
Source: by ATC-Distribution Group Inc. atcdg.com via web.archive.org
SELF TEST - & DTCs; EEC III; "...The EEC-III is one of the engine control computer systems used by Ford since midyear 1978. (We will cover the others in later issues.) This procedure uses an inexpensive voltmeter and other generally available test devices instead of the special diagnostic tester originally specified by Ford. Just follow these steps to get the service codes from cars using this system..."
Source: by tomco-inc.com
Self Test - Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) NO CODES Troubleshooting; "...The self-test plugs were mounted on the passenger side fender on 1985-86 EFI trucks; The self-test plugs are located along the driver's side fender behind the air filter box on 87-95 EFI trucks..."; miesk5 NOTE; Self-Test Input (STI) is the Pin in the Lt gray Connector and Signal Return Ground (STO/SIGRET) is Pin E in black Connector in 87-95; The engine temperature must be greater than 50°F (10°C) to pass the KOEO Self-Test and greater than 180°F (82°C) to pass the KOER Self-Test. Run it around to heat the engine up and shift thru all gears incl Reverse. Then turn off all accesories/lights, etc. Make sure A/C is off and transmission is in Park (automatic) or in Neutral for a Manual & release clutch. Do Key On Engine Off (KOEO) portion first. Fix any codes from the KOEO test before you do the running test (KOER, key on, engine running). Look Codes up in my broncolinks.com site using the new Search function. Hardware Limited Operation Strategy (HLOS) Overview; "...HLOS mode is used when the system fault(s) is too extreme for the FMEM mode to handle. In HLOS mode, all software operations have stopped and the computer is running on hardware control only. The default strategy for this mode has a minimal calibration just to allow the vehicle to operate until it can be serviced. NOTE: IN HLOS MODE YOU WILL NOT GET ERROR CODES. The MIL light is turned on as a bulb check when the ignition key is first turned "ON". The EEC IV computer turns off the bulb as soon as it receives the PIP (crank) signal. If the light stays on during cranking, the computer is not receiving the PIP signal..."
Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com
The On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) Executive; "...is a portion of the PCM strategy that manages the sequencing and execution of all diagnostic tests. It is the "traffic cop" of the diagnostic system. Each test/monitor can be viewed as an individual task, which may or may not be able to run concurrently with other tasks. The Diagnostic Executive enables/disables OBD monitors in order to accomplish the following: • Sequence the OBD monitors such that when a test runs, each input that it relies upon has already been tested. • Controls and co-ordinates the execution of the individual OBD system monitors: Catalyst, Misfire, EGR, O2, Fuel, AIR, EVAP and, Comprehensive Component Monitor (CCM). • Stores freeze frame and "similar condition" data • Manages storage and erasure of Diagnostic Trouble Codes as well as MIL illumination • Controls and co-ordinates the execution of the On-Demand tests: Key On Engine Off (KOEO), Key On Engine Running (KOER), and the Output Test Mode (OTM). • Performs transitions between various states of the diagnostic and powertrain control system to minimize the effects on vehicle operation. • Interfaces with the diagnostic test tools to provide diagnostic information (I/M readiness, various J1979 test modes) and responds to special diagnostic requests (J1979 Mode 08 and 09). The diagnostic also executive controls several overall, global OBD entry conditions. The Diagnostic Executive waits for 4 seconds after the PCM is powered before initiating any OBD monitoring. The Diagnostic Executive suspends OBD monitoring when battery voltage falls below 11.0 volts..."
Source: by Ford
TwEECer® Installation pics in a Lightning C3P3 in a 90
Source: by BlueBeast (The Beast, JP N) at SuperMotors.net
Waterproofing the EEC Discussion
Source: by members at FSB
Wiring Diagram in an 86 & Ford truck
Source: by Agnem (The Moosestang) at webshots.com